Category: "Seizure Types"

You May Not Know These Subtle Signs of a Seizure

You May Not Know These Subtle Signs of a Seizure

Key Takeaways A new survey found that most Americans can’t identify the more subtle signs of a seizure, including numbness or tingling, blinking rapidly, screaming, and laughing. Focal seizures—which occur as a result of abnormal electrical firing in a particular brain region—are the most common in adults with epilepsy. However, they’re hard to identify. If […]

DIAGNOSING SEIZURES IS KEY TO TREATMENT

DIAGNOSING SEIZURES IS KEY TO TREATMENT

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 1 out of 10 people will have a seizure during their lifetime. Most of these seizures will be epileptic seizures, which are caused by unusual brain activity that includes simultaneous firing of brain cells. The other type of seizures are non-epileptic seizures or attacks […]

Focal Epilepsy: What Happens in One-Sided Brain Seizures?

Focal Epilepsy: What Happens in One-Sided Brain Seizures?

Seizures That Don’t Affect the Entire Brain Focal epilepsy is when people have recurrent seizures that may cause symptoms affecting only one side of the body. Seizures in epilepsy can be focal or generalized. Focal epilepsy seizures, sometimes called partial seizures, involve more limited symptoms than generalized epilepsy seizures. A key difference is that a small area […]

Benign Rolandic Epilepsy

Benign Rolandic Epilepsy

What is Benign Rolandic Epilepsy? Benign rolandic epilepsy, also known as benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), causes seizures that occur during sleep. Other names for benign rolandic epilepsy are: Childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes Self-limited epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (SeLECTS) The term “benign” refers to the fact that all children outgrow these seizures by their […]

King’s College London Identifies Impulsivity-Linked Genes In Epilepsy

King’s College London Identifies Impulsivity-Linked Genes In Epilepsy

  The new study, published in Nature Genomic Medicine, analyzed DNA from individuals with Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy. It is the first to screen for and identify genetic variants associated with impulsivity in a neuropsychiatric disorder. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy is a common type of epilepsy characterized by several types of seizures starting in adolescence. This type […]

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