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Stress

What are the health effects of chronic stress?

We share this article since we all know stress is a trigger for seizures. EpilepsyU Short-lived feelings of stress are a regular part of daily life. When these feelings become chronic, or long-lasting, they can severely impact a person’s health. In this article, we look at what chronic stress is, how to identify it, and the medical consequences it can have. We also describe ways to manage stress, including medical treatments, and when to see a doctor. What is chronic stress? Signs of chronic stress can include headaches, fatigue, and low self-esteem. Stress is a biological response to demanding situations. It causes the body to release hormones, such as cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones help prepare the body to take action, for example by increasing the heart and breath rates. ...

Can Stress Busters Help Reduce Seizures?

Medications control seizures for about 70-80 percent of people with epilepsy. The other 20 percent have to live with the uncertainty of not knowing when the next seizure will strike.   Now, a promising new study looked at whether stress-reduction techniques could help reduce the frequency of seizures.

Learning stress-reducing techniques may benefit people with epilepsy

Learning techniques to help manage stress may help people with epilepsy reduce how often they have seizures, according to a study published in the February 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.   “Despite all the advances we have made with new drugs for epilepsy, at least one-third of people continue to have seizures, so new options are greatly needed,” said study author Sheryl R. Haut, MD, of Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, NY, and member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Since stress is the most common seizure trigger reported by patients, research into reducing stress could be valuable.”   The study involved people with seizures that did no...

Stress may trigger seizure for epilepsy patients

For people suffering with epilepsy, facing stressful events such as the war, trauma or natural disaster, or the death of a loved one, may act as a common trigger for seizures, a study has found. Epilepsy is a disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain is disturbed, causing seizures. The findings showed that higher anxiety levels in patients with epilepsy reported stress as a seizure trigger.

Activation of MMP-9 enzyme (Involved in ALS, Epilepsy) leads to behavioral problems connected to chronic stress

A team from the EPFL Brain Mind Institute has discovered an important synaptic mechanism: the activation of a cleaving enzyme, leading to behavioral problems connected to chronic stress. Why is it that when people are too stressed they are often grouchy, grumpy, nasty, distracted or forgetful? Researchers from the Brain Mind Institute (BMI) at EPFL have just highlighted a fundamental synaptic mechanism that explains the relationship between chronic stress and the loss of social skills and cognitive impairment. When triggered by stress, an enzyme attacks a synaptic regulatory molecule in the brain. This was revealed by a work published in Nature Communications. Carmen Sandi’s team went to look for answers in a region of the hippocampus known for its involvement in behavior and cogniti...

NON-EPILEPTIC SEIZURES: New research links anxiety to epilepsy-like seizure

New research by clinical psychologists from Arizona State University and the United Kingdom has revealed seizures that could be mistaken for epilepsy are linked to feelings of anxiety. The team of researchers devised a new set of tests to determine whether there was a link between how people interpret and respond to anxiety, and incidences of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Nicole Roberts, an associate professor in ASU’s New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, collaborated with colleagues from the University of Lincoln, University of Nottingham and University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. The team’s findings were published in the journal Epilepsy and Behavior. The researchers used a series of questionnaires and computer tests to determine if a patient regularly ...