MUSIC MAY HELP AGAINST EPILEPSY

MUSIC MAY HELP AGAINST EPILEPSY

According to scientists from Ohio state University (USA), the brains of people with epilepsy in a special way responds to music compared to people without this disease. Researchers believe that the music for patients with epilepsy can be used as a method of therapy that complements traditional treatment.

This writes the Chronicle.info with reference to medikforum.ru.

As the scientists explain, in the majority of cases (80%) the development of epilepsy cause the processes that occur in the temporal lobe of the brain. This part of the brain determines the sensitivity to the music.

Specialists carried out the experiments, which involved 21 patients with epilepsy. Volunteers play music works Coltrane and Mozart, and in those moments, for the activity of their brains was monitored by a sensitive scanning technique. In the control group listened to music participants without the disease.

These trials demonstrated that in patients with epilepsy brain waves are synchronized with the musical frequencies much more often than those who do not have this diagnosis. In General, according to scientists, the brain of epileptics are much more receptive to musical harmony and its activity in the form of corresponding reaction from them has been more intense.

The authors of the project expressed that music therapy can be a very promising method in the treatment of epilepsy. Previous research scientists from the medical school of the University of Maryland in the USA have shown that listening to music has a tremendously positive effect on the vascular system and improves blood circulation.

Source: The Sivler Telegram

Music & Epilepsy

Music & Epilepsy

How does music affect persons with epilepsy?

In some cases it can alleviate symptoms, whereas in others it can make matters worse.

Music and epilepsy

Epilepsy that’s triggered by musical stimulation is known as musicogenic epilepsy. This form of epilepsy was first noted by British Neurologist Macdonald Critchely in 1937.

Musicogenic epilepsy can be described as a form of reflex epilepsy (epilepsy that is triggered by a stimulus). Seizures are induced by exposure to a certain type of music. The musical trigger is different for everyone. For some, it may be a specific song, whereas others are triggered by a pitch or instrument.

According to a study of the disorder, a response can be linked to emotional or cognitive appreciation of the stimulus. Simply thinking or dreaming about the stimulation can also lead to an epileptic episode.

Musicogenic Epilepsy

Musicogenic epilepsy is a form of reflex epilepsy, is characterized by the triggering of epileptic seizures by specific music experiences. Individuals with musicogenic epilepsy differ in the music trigger, but may have similar seizures. Typically, these seizures are focal dyscognitive and have a temporal-lobe origin with a limbic system distribution. As such, the music trigger is likely related to either an emotional or memory aspect of music perception. Investigations into musicogenic epilepsy may lead to a better understanding of seizure propagation within the brain and of neurologic aspects of the music experience. Successful treatment of medication-resistant musicogenic epilepsy has been achieved with anterior temporal-lobe resection.

FOR PERSONS WITH EPILEPSY – MOZART MAY BE MEDICINAL

FOR PERSONS WITH EPILEPSY – MOZART MAY BE MEDICINAL

New research confirms listening to a much-studied Mozart sonata has an anti-epileptic effect on children.

The Mozart Effect —the notion that listening to music of the classical-era master, particularly his sublime Sonata for Two Pianos, can boost brain power—has experienced something of a renaissance. While some claims that circulated during its early ’90s media frenzy have been debunked, periodic studies have provided evidence that Mozart’s music improves cognition in young and old alike.

New research from the University of Edinburgh provides confirmation it can be very beneficial for one specific group of people: children suffering from epilepsy.

A common test that detects electrical activity in the brain reveals “there is an anti-epileptic effect of Mozart music,” reports a research team led by Eliza Grylls. Three pieces of contemporary popular music did not have the same positive impact.

“Given the large proportion of people suffering from epilepsy [who do not respond] to the current medical treatment, and the financial burden of anti-epileptic medication in our society, a new therapy would be welcomed,” they write in the journal Seizure.

 

Epileptic activity was measured for 25 minutes: five minutes of silence, to establish a baseline level; five minutes in which they listened to an excerpt from Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos (known by its catalog number K. 448); five more minutes of quiet; a five-minute excerpt of a different piece of music; and another five minutes of silence.

The other musical pieces were chosen from parents’ suggestions of their children’s favorites. Those under eight listened to Say Eh-Oh by the Teletubbies; eight- to 10-year-olds listened to Eelly-Ally-O by the Singing Kettle; and older kids listened to Year 3000 by the pop band Busted.

“A significant decrease in epileptic activity on EEG was found in the children during listening to Mozart compared to the baseline,” the researchers report. In contrast, there was no significant change in such activity during or after listening to the other pieces.

“This supports the idea that this effect is unique to Mozart, or at least to similarly structured music,” they conclude.

So what is it about Mozart that the brain responds to? “One theory is that as Mozart started composing at age 4, he exploited the inherent spatial temporal firing patterns of the cortex, and hence his music resonates cortical structure,” the researchers write.

Alternatively, the “repetition of the melodic line in Mozart’s music (may) reflect aspects of our brain and bodily function.”

But the fact the mechanism is still in dispute need not dissuade doctors from utilizing such a simple, low-cost treatment for a serious illness. For some sufferers, Mozart may be the best medicine.

Source: Pacific Standard by T. Jacobs

The Correlation of Music and Epilepsy

The Correlation of Music and Epilepsy

By EpilepsyU Guest Author:  Marie Miguel


MusicAndEpilepsyDid you know that about 20 to 40 percent of epilepsy patients have DRE or drug-resistant epilepsy? That’s about 400,000 Americans! Some also refer to this condition as intractable, uncontrolled, refractory, or pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, even in patients who respond well to pharmacological treatments, side-effects like liver damage, psychiatric symptoms, dizziness and cognitive impairment are common. Fortunately, the speed at which science and technology develops is amazing. Solutions like EHR help in data collection that can aid in the improvement and study of non-pharmacological treatments like music therapy. (more…)

Music Therapy May Hold Promise For Treating Epilepsy

Music Therapy May Hold Promise For Treating Epilepsy

listening-to-musicWe know that listening to classical music can lower blood pressure, reduce stress levels and even boost learning. But could it also help prevent seizures in people with epilepsy?

Now that neurologists have found that the brains of people with epilepsy process music very differently than the brains of people without the condition, this may be a real possibility.

The new research showed that when patients with epilepsy are listening to classical and jazz music, their brainwave patterns actually sync up with the melodies.

“Like musicians whose brains synchronize with music, persons with epilepsy synchronize to the music in the temporal lobe, where majority of seizures begin,” Christine Charyton, Ph.D., a neurologist at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and one of the study’s authors, told The Huffington Post in an email. (more…)

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