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marijuania

Today Is a Historic Day – DEA Schedules First FDA Marijuania Based Medication

Thursday, September 27 marks a historic day. Today the DEA (United States Drug Enforcement Administration) scheduled the first marijuana based medication. Epidiolex(r) is a FDA approved medication that is made up of highly-purified, plant-derived cannabidiol (CBD) in a proprietary oral solution of pure plant-derived cannabidiol or CBD and was scheduled today at a “V”.  Epidiolex(R) will be used for, early-onset, treatment-resistant epilepsy syndromes including Dravet syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) and Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). The release of the drug will mark the first time that such a prescription drug has been made available to the U.S. public and now is available for sale in the U.S.  The company needs to finalize the product label for the drug and expects ...

Epilepsy Epilepsy expert discusses latest research, side effects and FDA guidance for use aproved CBD treatment

Treating epilepsy presents a variety of challenges for patients and their families. Sometimes, it takes time to find the right medication and dosing to properly manage seizures and other epilepsy-related health issues. Or it may be necessary to adjust the medication so that it doesn’t cause side effects that impact quality of life. This is especially true for patients with two rare forms of severe childhood-onset epilepsy: Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. In the search for new treatments for these rare forms of epilepsy, researchers have been studying marijuana-based drugs for their potential seizure-controlling benefits. In June, the FDA approved cannabidiol (CBD), a marijuana-based medication, for the treatment of seizures in patients (age 2 and older) who have been diagnosed...

Public faith in marijuana outpaces medical research, study finds

Despite limited evidence, Americans have an increasingly positive view of the health benefits of marijuana. Nearly two-thirds believe pot can reduce pain, while close to half say it improves symptoms of anxiety, depression, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis, according to a new online survey of 9,003 adults. Pennsylvania and New Jersey are among the 30 states, along with the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico, that have legalized medical marijuana. But scientists say hard data on the health effects of pot — both positive and negative — are largely missing. Because marijuana is considered an illicit drug by the federal government, research has been scant, though there are efforts underway in Pennsylvania and nationally to remedy that. “I am not surprised at all [by the survey]. At th...