Welcome to EpilepsyU.com a social network dedicated to the epilepsy community

Global

Hmmm . . . Iranian scientists claim to develop cure for epilepsy

TEHRAN — A team of Iranian scientists has claimed to produce an effective cure for epilepsy using three medicinal herbs, ISNA reported on Friday. “Medications used to treat epilepsy such as phenobarbital have side effects and should be taken regularly for life,” the project manager Reza Mazloum Farsibaf, has said. Common side effects of phenobarbital include dizziness, drowsiness, problems with memory or concentration, irritability, aggression, confusion (especially in children or older adults), loss of balance or coordination, headache, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, or constipation as your body adjusts to the medication.

Medical cannabis for epilepsy approved in FDA first

In the context of an ever-louder international debate on whether patients with severe forms of epilepsy should be allowed to use medical cannabis to manage their condition, the Food and Drug Administration have just officially approved one such drug.   The Food and Drug Administration have just approved a cannabis-based drug for the first time.  

Adjunctive Everolimus Reduces Seizure Frequency in Tuberous Sclerosis

Adjunctive everolimus therapy is safe and effective for reducing the frequency of seizures in pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), according to a post-hoc analysis of a phase 3, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study published in the May 23 online edition of The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.   Epileptic seizures in TSC are difficult to treat, because most patients become treatment refractory. Typically, the onset of epilepsy occurs during infancy and early childhood, which makes treatment decisions difficult.

Prediction method for epileptic seizures developed

Epileptic seizures strike with little warning and nearly one third of people living with epilepsy are resistant to treatment that controls these attacks. More than 65 million people worldwide are living with epilepsy.

Researchers discover novel mode of neurotransmitter-based communication

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the first example of a novel mode of neurotransmitter-based communication. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, challenges current dogma about mechanisms of signaling in the brain, and uncovers new pathways for developing therapies for disorders like epilepsy, anxiety and chronic pain.

Call to action builds on 2015 WHO Resolution on Epilepsy, which aims to improve knowledge, services, and treatment of epilepsy worldwide

Representatives from the International League against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the International Bureau for Epilepsy (IBE), alongside prominent members of the Global epilepsy community, are meeting this week to encourage World Health Assembly (WHA) members and the World Health Organization (WHO) to continue to recognize epilepsy as a global health priority in countries around the world.   Coinciding with the 71st World Health Assembly, advocates will focus on progressing the milestone 2015 WHO Resolution on epilepsy to encourage countries to prioritize epilepsy at national levels, including promoting awareness, eliminating stigma of the disease, expanding research capacity, improving monitoring and surveillance, and expanding access to care.   One of the particular areas of focus will...

Mechanism underlying malformation associated with severe epilepsy is revealed

Study suggests dysregulation of gene NEUROG2 could be linked to development of focal cortical dysplasia, one of the most common causes of drug-resistant epilepsy   One of the most frequent causes of drug-resistant epilepsy, considered a difficult disease to control, is a brain malformation known as focal cortical dysplasia.   Patients with this problem present with discreet disorganization in the architecture of a specific region of the cortex, which may or may not be associated with the presence of nerve cells that have structural and functional abnormalities.

With Epilepsy on The Rise, Thousands of Americans Are Turning To The Internet For Advice

Epilepsy is on the rise in the USA, recent figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirm. According to a 2018 report issued by the CDC, “Active Epilepsy and Seizure Control in Adults — United States, 2013 and 2015”, the number of Americans self-reporting epilepsy rose from 2.3 million in 2010, to approximately 3 million in 2015. A 1994 report — Current Trends Prevalence of Self-Reported Epilepsy, United States, 1986-1990 — estimated that the number of Americans with self reported epilepsy was just 1.1 million at the time. Why we built the 100% non-profit EpilepsyU.com for U www.EpilepsyU.com reaches an average of 1.3 million visitors each month!) An increasing number of Americans are utilizing the internet for advice about their condition highlighting the...

Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Treatment Commences Clinical Trial Recruitment

This week, AMO Pharma Limited announced the commencement of patient recruitment for an interventional study of AMO-01, an investigational Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor for the treatment of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS).   “Treatment of Phelan-McDermid syndrome represents a significant area of unmet need in healthcare, and AMO Pharma is grateful to the research team at Mt. Sinai as well as the Phelan McDermid Syndrome Foundation for their commitment to this landmark research effort,” said Michael Snape, PhD, CEO of AMO Pharma. “Research thus far indicates that AMO-01 could have important applications in the treatment of patients living with Phelan-McDermid syndrome in the years ahead.”

FDA Reports a Life-Threatening Immune Reaction to Lamotrigine: What You Should Know

A rare but life-threatening immune reaction in response to lamotrigine (Lamictal) requires prompt diagnosis and treatment, according to a recent alert from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).   On April 25, the FDA issued what it calls a “drug safety communication” about the risk of a condition so rare that few neurologists have heard of it: hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a systematic immune reaction that can result in organ failure and death if not quickly treated.   Just eight such cases associated with lamotrigine, including one death, are known by the FDA to have occurred since the drug was first approved in 1994 as a treatment for epilepsy. Since then, it has also been approved for bipolar disorder, and is now increasingly prescribed off-label...

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugs

New treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don’t work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea — a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look promising.

Qualifying for Social Security Disability Benefits with Epilepsy 2018

If you or someone you love has epilepsy, you may be eligible for benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA). Epilepsy will not qualify with a diagnosis alone, but depending on what type of seizures you have and how well you’re able to control your symptoms, you may be eligible for monthly financial aid. Medically Qualifying Via the Blue Book The SSA uses its own medical guide, known as the Blue Book, when determining whether or not an applicant is eligible for Social Security disability benefits. In October 2017, the SSA updated its Blue Book listing for epilepsy. Right now, there are four ways to qualify instead of just two, and the SSA no longer uses outdated terms like “grand mal” seizures. It will be slightly easier for people with tonic-clonic seizures to qualify for disab...