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Epilepsy in seniors

Risk for Late-Onset Epilepsy Linked to a Class of Protein, Smoking, Diabetes

A recent study has shown that a class of proteins involved in the metabolism of fats in the body. Apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) genotype and the presence of potentially modifiable risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, and diabetes in midlife are associated with a higher risk for late-onset epilepsy. Participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study were enrolled in it. At baseline, the investigators collected data on demographics, lifestyle factors, vascular status, and potential epilepsy risk factors. At first study visit, the median participant age was 55 years. The main outcome was the time to late-onset epilepsy development at age less than 60 years of age. Participants were followed from 1987-1989 through 2013. During follow-up, a total of 596 patients devel...

Cognition and Dementia in Older Patients With Epilepsy

With advances in healthcare and an ageing population, the number of older adults with epilepsy is set to rise substantially across the world. In developed countries the highest incidence of epilepsy is already in people over 65 and, as life expectancy increases, individuals who developed epilepsy at a young age are also living longer. Recent findings show that older persons with epilepsy are more likely to suffer from cognitive dysfunction and that there might be an important bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and dementia. Thus some people with epilepsy may be at a higher risk of developing dementia, while individuals with some forms of dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, are at significantly higher risk of developing epilepsy. Consistent with ...

Epilepsy and Seizures in Older Adults

Did you know that epilepsy is more likely to develop in older adults? Seizures can be easy to miss. Learn how to recognize the signs and how you can help.   Epilepsy is brain disorder that causes repeated seizures. About 3 million US adults aged 18 years or older have active epilepsy.1 Nearly 1 million of those adults are aged 55 or older.1 As our population ages, there will be even more older people with epilepsy in the coming years.

Epilepsy and Seizures in Older Adults

Did you know that seizures are more likely to develop in older adults? Learn to recognize the signs of seizures and how you can help. Epilepsy is a broad term used for a brain disorder that causes seizures. In the United States, 2.4 million adults aged 18 years or older have active epilepsy.1,2 About 1% of adults 65 years of age and older have active epilepsy, which is about 447,000 people.1,2 That’s about the size of Corpus Christi, TX. With the aging of the population, we can expect to see greater numbers of people with epilepsy. Epilepsy is more likely to develop in older adults rather than younger adults because as people age, the risk of seizures and epilepsy rises.3,4 Some older adults may have lived with epilepsy throughout their lives, but others might develop epilepsy later in lif...