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Drug Developed Thanks to Zebrafish Epilepsy Research Reaches Clinical Trials

We have been posting about using Zebrafish to model epilepsy treatment since 2013, and about the potential for treatments to be developed from these models. Fast forward to 2017, and we have a viable treatment in clinical trials! Via News Medical: New drug discovered in zebrafish model of pediatric epilepsy shows promising results in clinical study “Bench-to-bedside” describes research that has progressed from basic science in animal models that has led to therapies used in patients. Now, a study in the journal Brain describes what could be considered a direct “aquarium-to-bedside” approach, taking a drug discovered in a genetic zebrafish model of epilepsy and testing it, with promising results, in a small number of children with the disease. The study was supported...

SLATE clinical trial uses Medtronic Visualase MRI-guided laser ablation system to treat common form of epilepsy

Medtronic plc (NYSE: MDT) announced today that the first procedure using the Visualase(TM) MRI-Guided Laser Ablation System has been performed in the pivotal SLATE (Stereotactic Laser Ablation for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy) clinical trial at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Study shows long-term gains from hastening surgical interventions against epilepsy

There are important, long-term gains from hastening the processes around surgical interventions against epilepsy – before the disease has had too much negative impact on brain functions and patients’ lives. These are some of the findings of a thesis for which more than 500 patients were studied and followed up.

Specific Brain Lesion Linked to Post-Stroke Epilepsy

HOUSTON — Researchers may have identified a common pathologic lesion in many patients with post-stroke epilepsy (PSE).

Puzzle of Impaired Consciousness in Absence Epilepsy Solved?

Intense abnormal activity in well-known brain networks that occurs early in a seizure may be the key to impaired consciousness in children with absence epilepsy, new research suggests.

Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), people also experience major sleep problems, including changes in their sleep-wake cycle. A new study shows that recovering from these two conditions occurs in parallel. The study is published in the December 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

First-Line Treatment With Carbamazepine in Neonatal Epilepsy

Low-dose carbamazepine (CBZ) should be considered as first-line treatment for benign familial neonatal epilepsy (BNFE), even in cases of status epilepticus, according to data reported recently in Epilepsia. The majority of neonates given CBZ 10 mg/d as needed responded within hours of administration and remained seizure free with continued treatment for up to 16 years.

Study improves molecular understanding of the brain in people with epilepsy

Neural stem cells have been found in epileptic brain tissue—outside the regions of the brain where they normally reside. In a group of patients who underwent surgery for epilepsy, over half had stem cells where healthy individuals do not have them, according to a study from Sahlgrenska Academy.

AVOIDING SIDE EFFECTS: Trial Administers Epilepsy Drugs Directly to the Brain

WORLD-first trial will deliver medication directly into the brain of epilepsy patients to sidestep the ­devastating side-effects of tablets. The pioneering treatment aims to be a game-changer for neurological conditions more widely by getting a drug directly where it is needed. The St Vincent’s Hospital team has implanted a pump in their first ­patient. The pump sends anti-epileptic medication from the stomach, through a tiny tube, into a cavity in the brain where it can diffuse into the areas causing the “electrical storm”. READ FULL STORY: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-epilepsy-trial-delivers-medication-directly-into-brain-to-sidestep-side-effects/news-story/13612af0fd456d18583b60cd16d3102e

Understanding Stroke Risk in Pregnancy

A New York State study found that younger, not older women suffered an increase risk of stroke, both during pregnancy and in postpartum. Younger women — not older women — had an increased risk of stroke during pregnancy and the postpartum period compared to non-pregnant women of the same age, according to the results of a new study published online October 24, 2016 in JAMA Neurology. Overall, pregnancy-associated stroke (PAS) accounted for 15 percent of strokes in women aged 12 to 24 years; 20 percent of strokes in women aged 25 to 34 years; 5 percent of strokes in women aged 35 to 44 years; and 0.05 percent of strokes in women aged 45 to 50 years.

MS drug may reverse some physical disability

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY Via Eureka Alert MINNEAPOLIS – A drug used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS), alemtuzumab, was found to reverse some of the physical disability caused by the disease, according to new research published in the October 12, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Because it can cause serious side effects, alemtuzumab is generally used in people who have not responded well to other MS drugs; however, in this study it was used relatively early in the course of MS. The drug is used in relapsing-remitting MS, the most common form of the disease, in which symptoms alternate between sudden worsening and remission. “While many MS drugs slow the progress of disability, there have been little data about the abi...

Researchers discover a new stage of the development cycle of the human brain

Researchers discover mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex after birth Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. The authors hypothesize that this late-stage migration may play a role in establishing fundamentally human cognitive abilities and that its disruption could underlie a number of neurodevelopmental diseases. Most neurons of the cerebral cortex – the outermost layer of the brain responsible for advanced cognition – migrate outward from their birthplaces deep in the brain to take up their positions within the cortex....

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