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Surgery

SLATE clinical trial uses Medtronic Visualase MRI-guided laser ablation system to treat common form of epilepsy

Medtronic plc (NYSE: MDT) announced today that the first procedure using the Visualase(TM) MRI-Guided Laser Ablation System has been performed in the pivotal SLATE (Stereotactic Laser Ablation for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy) clinical trial at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

Study shows long-term gains from hastening surgical interventions against epilepsy

There are important, long-term gains from hastening the processes around surgical interventions against epilepsy – before the disease has had too much negative impact on brain functions and patients’ lives. These are some of the findings of a thesis for which more than 500 patients were studied and followed up.

New Research Shows Promise for Surgery For Specific Epilepsy Cause

Neurology Advisor: Seizure Reduction Likely With Surgery in Nonlesional Neocortical Epilepsy

Epilepsy – why do seizures sometimes continue after surgery?

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Brain, has highlighted the potential reasons why many patients with severe epilepsy still continue to experience seizures even after surgery.

Surgery can be cost-effective and beneficial for epilepsy patients, study finds

Research has shown that surgery can provide important benefits for patients with epilepsy. Now a new study finds that it is also cost-effective. In a study of 207 patients with epilepsy who were treated at 15 different centers in France, the proportion of patients who were completely seizure-free during the last 12 months was 69 percent among patients who underwent surgery and 12 percent among patients who received continued medical care during the second year, and it was respectively 77 percent and 21 percent during the fifth year. Direct costs became significantly lower in the surgical group during the third year after surgery, as a result of less antiepileptic drug use. “Surgery became cost-effective between nine and 10 years after surgery and even earlier if indirect costs were t...

Brain Implant that ‘Dissolves’ Over Time

An implantable brain device that literally melts away at a pre-determined rate minimizes injury to tissue normally associated with standard electrode implantation, according to research led by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The researchers describe online in Nature Materials a new class of technology that provides greater resolution for measuring electrical activity in space and time that matches or exceeds existing methods. “Dissolvable silicon electronics offer an unprecedented opportunity to implant advanced monitoring systems that eliminate the risks, cost, and discomfort associated with surgery to extract current devices used for post-operative monitoring,” said senior co-author Brian Litt, MD, a professor of Neurology, Neuro...

Experimental drug candidate may aid traumatic brain injury patients

A new report by University of Kentucky researcher Linda Van Eldik, PhD, describes an experimental drug candidate that may aid patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The article appeared this week in the journal PLoS One, the world’s largest biology journal. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls, motor vehicle collisions, and assault make up the most common causes of TBI. Symptoms of TBI, which include impaired cognition, memory, and motor control, may be temporary or permanent depending on the severity of the injury. “Following a head injury, the body mobilizes immune cells to respond to the trauma and jump-start the healing process,” Van Eldik said. “Although these immune cells help repair the injury, they also cause inflamma...

Computer Simulation Predicts Targets for Epilepsy Surgery

Severe cases of epilepsy are treated sometimes by surgically removing brain tissue thought to be responsible for generating seizures. This is accomplished by using EEG and then relying on  knowledge to excise areas previously known to generate aberrant electrical activity. The lack of precise personalized treatment results in a high failure rate for the procedure, but researchers at Newcastle University in England have developed a simulator that may help overcome that. The software uses patient MRI scans to create a model that it can manipulate. The model consists of the neural network represented by nodes and connections between them. The simulator mimics the removal of different nodes to see how they affect the activity in the rest of the network. The researchers compared the response of...

New Wearable EEG!

Researchers have developed a wearable electroencephalogram (EEG) device that can detect and record seizure activity in epilepsy patients in the outpatient setting, they reported on Monday at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society in Philadelphia. The so-called EEG Patch, a small, waterproof, scalp-mounted device, was designed to help patients more accurately track their seizures, Mark Lehmkuhle, PhD, a research assistant professor in neurosurgery at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, who presented the findings at the meeting, told the Neurology Today Conference Reporter ahead of the session.   The EEG Patch is designed to be fixed to a part of the patient’s scalp where seizures are known to originate based on EEG recorded in-hospital during a traditio...

VNS technology could help improve lives of people recovering from stroke

A new study involving UT Dallas researchers shows that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) technology could help improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people who suffer weakness and paralysis caused by strokes. The study, published in the journal Stroke, marks the first time that VNS has been tested in individuals recovering from stroke. VNS already has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for certain illnesses, such as depression and epilepsy. It involves sending a mild electric pulse through the vagus nerve, which is in the neck. Stimulating this nerve relays information about the state of the body to the brain and encourages it to reorganize in a process called neural plasticity.

Research Focusses on Epilepsy Related Memory Decline

Researchers from Brazil, Mexico and the United States presented the findings of four individual studies that examined the impact of epilepsy on memory decline at the 69th annual conference of the American Epilepsy Society (AES) in Pennsylvania. The papers focused on how neuron loss from the memory-related hippocampus triggers the occurrence of epileptic seizures in the brain’s temporal lobe. It has been determined that patients who experience temporal epilepsy as a result of hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS) often suffer from memory impairment and difficulty in recalling details of particular events in their daily lives.

Seizure control improves for TSC patients undergoing more extensive surgery

Children with the genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) often need epilepsy surgery for severe, uncontrollable seizures. A new study finds that seizure control is improved for patients undergoing more extensive surgery, reports the October issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. Seizures occurring in TSC are related to development of brain tumors, known as “tubers,” that develop in this disorder. But the new study by Dr. Aria Fallah of Miami Children’s Hospital and colleagues finds better outcomes when surgery includes the entire “epileptogenic zone” from which seizures are originating—not just the tuber itself. Epilepsy Surgery for Tuberous Sclerosis—Study from Six Specialty Ce...

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