Welcome to EpilepsyU.com a social network dedicated to the epilepsy community

memory

Electrical brain stimulation found to improve working memory

Scientists may have found a way to improve brain connectivity. The findings may boost short-term working memory, and in the future, they may help to repair brain damage in patients with traumatic brain injury, stroke, or epilepsy.

Connection found between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

A new study undertaken jointly by researchers from the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and European researchers, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, exposes a new biological mechanism that, on the one hand, damages a very specific type of memory, but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy.

Young adults with hostile attitudes may experience memory and thinking problems decades later

Young adults with hostile attitudes or those who don’t cope well with stress may be at increased risk for experiencing memory and thinking problems decades later, according to a study published in the March 2, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “We may not think of our personality traits as having any bearing on how well we think or remember things, but we found that the effect of having a hostile attitude and poor coping skills on thinking ability was similar to the effect of more than a decade of aging,” said study author Lenore J. Launer, PhD, with the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

Weak Electrical Field May Spread Brain Waves Linked To Memory And Epilepsy

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University may have found a new way information is communicated throughout the brain. Their discovery could lead to identifying possible new targets to investigate brain waves associated with memory and epilepsy and better understand healthy physiology. They recorded neural spikes traveling at a speed too slow for known mechanisms to circulate throughout the brain. The only explanation, the scientists say, is the wave is spread by a mild electrical field they could detect. Computer modeling and in-vitro testing support their theory.

Research Focusses on Epilepsy Related Memory Decline

Researchers from Brazil, Mexico and the United States presented the findings of four individual studies that examined the impact of epilepsy on memory decline at the 69th annual conference of the American Epilepsy Society (AES) in Pennsylvania. The papers focused on how neuron loss from the memory-related hippocampus triggers the occurrence of epileptic seizures in the brain’s temporal lobe. It has been determined that patients who experience temporal epilepsy as a result of hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS) often suffer from memory impairment and difficulty in recalling details of particular events in their daily lives.

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that several dementia-related brain changes, or pathologies, are associated with the decline in memory awareness. “Our findings suggest that unawareness of one’s memory problems is an inevitable feature of late-life dementia, driven by a buildup of dementia-related changes in the brain,” said study author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Lack of awareness of memory loss is common in dementia, but we haven’t known muc...

UNDERSTANDING THE BRAIN: How your brain forms memories

Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases. Specifically, the study examined neurons in the medial temporal lobe associated with episodic memory, the brain’s ability to consciously recall experienced events and situations like running into an old school friend at the opera. Episodic memory logs these unique experiences and relies on the very rapid formation of new associations in the brain. The team was able to record individual neurons in the media...

Study Identifies Brain Cells Responsible for Memory-Based Decision Making

The witness on the stand says he saw the accused at the scene of the crime. Is he sure? How sure? The jury’s verdict could hinge on that level of certainty. Many decisions we make every day are influenced by our memories and the confidence we have in them. But very little is known about how we decide whether we can trust a memory or not. A new Cedars-Sinai study provides some of the answers. Researchers have identified a unique set of neurons in the medial temporal lobe, an area of the brain where memories and memory-based decisions are processed. They show that the activity of these neurons is indicative of the confidence by which a memory will be retrieved. Findings are published in the June 8 online issue of Nature Neuroscience. “The mechanisms that help us make confidence j...

BREAKTHROUGH: Understanding and Reversing Memory Loss in Epilepsy Patients

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham identifies an epigenetic cause for why patients with temporal lobe epilepsy tend to have memory loss, and suggests a potential way to reverse that loss. The findings, published in April in the Annals of Translational and Clinical Neurology, indicate the discovery may have implications for many other memory disorders. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy have a high incidence of memory loss, even when seizures associated with epilepsy are controlled well by medication. The UAB research team targeted the BDNF gene, which is known to play a role in memory formation. The gene produces a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor. An epigenetic process called DNA methylation regulates when genes are turned on or off. When turned on...

Epilepsy Drugs Could Be Used To Prevent Or Treat Symptoms Of Alzheimer’s Disease

With the lack of reliable treatment for Alzheimer’s disease today, neurologists have focused their attention on treating the disease or at the very least delaying its onset. A recent study conducted at the University of British Columbia has found that drugs used to prevent or reduce the severity of epileptic seizures, also known as anticonvulsants, could become a promising treatment option for patients with Alzheimer’s as well. “Now we have many different research groups using antiepileptic drugs that engage the same target, and all point to a therapeutic effect in both Alzheimer’s disease models and patients with the disease,” Dr. Haakon Nygaard, the Fipke Professor in Alzheimer’s Research in UBC’s Faculty of Medicine, said in a statement.

Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. People age 85 and older make up the fastest growing age group in the United States and worldwide. “As millions of older US adults are reaching the age where they may experience these memory and thinking problem called Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), it is important we look to find lifestyle changes that may stave off the condition,” said study author Rosebud Roberts, MB, ChB, MS, of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. and a member of the America...

A Computer Test to Speed Up Neurology Exams

A new computerized exam has been developed that can drastically speed up the amount of time that it takes for a neurologist to identify areas of concern in patients and deliver more accurate diagnoses, and care. The cognition tests can take about 20 minutes up to one hour depending on the number of areas that you wish to evaluate. “What we’ve been up to is trying to digitize, quantify, and objectify aspects of the neurologic exam having to do with patients’ function. For too long we’ve been led by the legacy of Charcot with the physical examination to help us evaluate the impact that patients have from their disease. We use the question, “How are you?” And we use our own perceptions and examination techniques.”

Lost Password

Register