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What to know about frontal lobe headaches

Several types of headache involve frontal head pain, and identifying the type experienced can help to determine the best treatment.   Pain in the front of the head is sometimes described as a frontal lobe headache.   According to the National Institute of Health, more than 9 out of 10 people will experience a headache at some point. Headaches are among the most common reasons for visiting a doctor or missing work or school.   In this article, we look at types of headache that can cause pain in the front of the head. We discuss causes, symptoms, means of prevention, treatment options, and when to see a doctor.

Can apple cider vinegar cure a headache?

Headaches are a common annoyance for most people. There are numerous claims about the benefits of apple cider vinegar, from improving digestion to helping to treat headaches.   Whether apple cider vinegar is effective for treating headaches is not yet scientifically proven, but it is still praised by many as a natural treatment that can do little harm. In this article, we look at the evidence.  

NEUROLOGY: Gastric Surgery May Be Risk Factor for Headaches

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. In the study, gastric bypass surgery and gastric banding surgery were associated with later developing a condition called spontaneous intracranial hypotension in a small percentage of people. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often caused by a leak of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) out of the spinal canal. The leak causes low pressure of the spinal fluid, triggering sudden headaches in the upright position, which are relieved when lying down. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, neck stiffness and difficulty concentrating.

New possibilities for molecular medicine

Scientists at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle have determined the atomic architecture of a sodium channel. The achievement opens new possibilities for molecular medicine researchers around the world in designing better drugs for pain, epilepsy, and heart rhythm disturbances. Sodium channels are pores in the membranes of excitable cells – such as brain nerve cells or beating heart cells – that emit electrical signals. Sodium channels selectively open and close to allow the passage of millions of tiny charged particles across the cell membrane. The gated flow of sodium ions generates tiny amounts of electrical current.

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