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Epilepsy

How to deal with epilepsy

Epilepsy is a condition where the nerve cell activity in the brain is disturbed.  Epilepsy is a disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain is disturbed, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness.  People with epilepsy behave differently. Some simply stare blankly for a few seconds during a seizure, while others repeatedly twitch their arms or legs.  You need to have two unprovoked seizures to be diagnosed with epilepsy. All seizures need to be treated because they can be dangerous during activities such as driving or swimming.

What should you do if a friend has a seizure?

Ten percent of people are expected to experience a seizure at some point during their lifetime, but would you know what to do if someone was having a seizure right next to you? Would you recognize it for what it was? Here, we give you an overview of different types of seizures and offer some helpful first aid tips.

What Are Epileptic Seizures and What Causes Them?

A person can suffer from an epileptic seizure (also frequently known as an epileptic fit) when they experience abnormal electrical activity in the brain. This can be a serious medical condition, and any member of the population could potentially experience an epileptic seizure at some point in their lives. In this article, we’re going to go through exactly what happens when an epileptic fit occurs, and how they can be triggered.

More Americans living with epilepsy than ever before!

The number of Americans with epilepsy is on the rise, with at least 3 million adults and 470,000 children living with the disorder, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain that causes seizures. In most cases the cause is unknown, but it can be brought on by a number of different conditions, including stroke, brain tumor, head injury, central nervous system infections, or genetic risks. According to the new CDC data, the number of U.S. adults with active epilepsy rose from 2.3 million in 2010 to 3 million in 2015. The number of children with epilepsy increased from 450,000 in 2007 to 470,000 in 2015. To get these estimates, the researchers analyzed national and state-specific reports. This is the first time epilepsy ...

Pairnomix, StemoniX Develop Epilepsy Model in Search for New Anti-seizure Drugs

Pairnomix has joined efforts with StemoniX to develop a lab-based model of epileptic seizures using so-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The model, which researchers refer to as a “seizure-in-a-dish” model system, will allow scientists to study seizures at a network level. In this way, they can use the model to screen for anti-epileptic drugs in a fast and easy manner. Minneapolis-based Pairnomix has expertise in epilepsy models, while San Diego-based StemoniX has developed the microBrain Platform. The model mirrors tissue architecture in the brain, with nerve cells connecting to each other through synapses, forming functional networks. For brain diseases such as epilepsy, iPSCs are invaluable research tools. These cells can be derived from skin tissue, and are forced to backt...

This Is What It’s Really Like to Have Epilepsy

Epilepsy nearly took Emily Borghard’s life before she was diagnosed—she’s not only learned to live with the condition, but thrive as well. For Emily Borghard, 28, life growing up on a farm in upstate New York was filled with carefree activities in her close-knit community. Volunteer work with local soccer programs took up much of her time, and when her first seizure hit, she was a senior in high school applying for college admission miles away from home. Epilepsy causes seizures as a result of unusual electrical activity in the brain, usually due to brain injury though often it has no identifiable cause. “My first seizure occurred during a car accident. I was going home after a sleepover with my friends and I drove right off the road into a creek. I live in such a small town th...

Opinion: It’s time to bring epilepsy awareness out of the dark ages

It is one of the most common brain ailments, affecting over 65 million people globally, and yet it remains shrouded in stigma and ignorance. Epilepsy: a disease that is as old as civilization itself. According to Epilepsy Canada, tablets regarding medical records from Babylonia dating to 2000 BC accurately describe the different types of epileptic seizures. In Canada, it is estimated that around 139,200 people have epilepsy. The good news is that according to a Statistics Canada survey, 39 per cent of those living independently with epilepsy say it does not affect their life at all. An estimated 44 per cent suggest that epilepsy has little or only a moderate effect on their lives. However, 18 per cent say that epilepsy has affected them quite a bit. The bad news is that in the same survey,...

Brain damage can make sideways faces more memorable, and give us ’emotion blindness’

People with damage to a crucial part of the brain fail to recognise facial emotions, but they unexpectedly find faces looking sideways more memorable researchers have found. The findings are more evidence that damage to the amygdala affects how facial recognition and gaze perception work in unpredictable ways. Perception and understanding the facial cues of others is essential in human societies. Patients with amygdala damage, which is common in epilepsy for example, struggle in their understanding of social signals as well as in everyday communication, which can lead to problems in their interactions with friends and family, finding life partners, and progressing with their professional careers. They often feel misunderstood which contributes to lower levels of life satisfaction. Normally...

Secret of Epilepsy Discovered in Jerusalem?

Unable to figure out what causes the neurological disorder, the scientists thought to ask: What causes normal people (or lab animals) not to have it? Epileptic seizures are caused by abnormal activity in our brain. We know that. Attacks can be unprovoked or can be the result from a tendency that is created, for instance, by head trauma or exposure to certain stimuli. We know that too. We don’t know, however, is why some people are prone to epilepsy and some are not.

New Epilepsy Classifications

For the first time in almost three decades, the classification for epileptic seizures has been updated. The new system formally recognizes some seizure types, provides additional information on causes, and replaces obscure or questionable words and terms with more meaningful ones, the authors say.

Suppressing epileptic seizures via Anderson localization

More than 50 million people of all ages suffer from epilepsy, otherwise known as seizure disorder, the fourth most common neurological disease in the world. Patients diagnosed with epilepsy often experience recurrent seizures triggered by the firing of a large collection of neurons in the brain. This ultimately generates a high-energy wave that spreads across the surface of the brain, resulting in numerous physical effects such as erratic body shaking, unconsciousness, exhaustion, and pain.

Having Depression Increases the Likelihood of Developing Epilepsy

There is a growing interest over the possible relationship between depression and epilepsy. A study recently published showed that there is an increased risk of developing epilepsy among persons diagnosed with depression, and vice versa. Epilepsy is a syndrome characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures due to an imbalance of chemicals in the nervous system. This chemical imbalance is also one of the underlying mechanisms of depression. This similarity in pathophysiology has sparked an interest among the medical community to determine the possible relationship between the two diseases.

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