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CBD and epilepsy

Cannabis Compound Confirmed as Epilepsy Treatment for Atonic Seizures (Drop Attacks)

Cannabidiol (CBD), a compound derived from the cannabis plant that does not produce a “high” and has been an increasing focus of medical research, was shown in a new large-scale, randomized, controlled trial to significantly reduce the number of dangerous seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy called Lennox–Gastaut syndrome.   In the new study comparing 2 doses of CBD to a placebo, the researchers reported a 41.9 percent reduction in “drop seizures”—a type of seizure that results in severe loss of muscle control and balance—in patients taking a 20 mg/kg/d CBD regimen, a 37.2 percent reduction in those on a 10 mg/kg/d CBD regimen, and a 17.2 percent reduction in a group given a placebo.

Epilepsy, Medical Marijuana and CBD: Myths and Facts

While a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recently recommended pharmaceutical-grade cannabidiol (CBD) as a treatment for two rare forms of epilepsy, CBD medication is not the same thing as medical marijuana, which is more available than ever before and promoted for wide variety of health conditions. The American Epilepsy Society (AES) wants to alert the 3 million people with epilepsy about the myths and facts related to CBD medication – derived from one of the many compounds found in in cannabis (the marijuana plant) – and medical marijuana.   Medical marijuana, which is now legal in 29 states as well as the District of Columbia, refers to the physician-prescribed use of the whole, unprocessed marijuana plant or its basic extracts to treat the symptoms of an illness and othe...

Cannabidiol reduces seizures in treatment-resistant epilepsy

Cannabidiol is an effective and generally well-tolerated add-on treatment for drop seizures in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, according to research published in The Lancet. “Patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a rare, severe form of epileptic encephalopathy, are frequently treatment resistant to available medications,” Elizabeth A. Thiele, MD, from the pediatric epilepsy program at Massachusetts General Hospital, and colleagues wrote. “No controlled studies have investigated the use of cannabidiol for patients with seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.”

Yet More Good News for GW Pharma’s Cannabinoid Drug Against Epilepsy

New data in The Lancet provides further support for GW Pharma’s drug, Epidiolex, for the treatment of a rare form of epilepsy.   GW Pharmaceuticals has achieved encouraging Phase III results for Epidiolex, which have been published in leading scientific journal, The Lancet. The company’s lead candidate is being developed for the treatment of epilepsy – a condition characterized by the abnormal firing of neurons in the brain, leading to seizures. In particular, the company targets Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a rare, lifelong form of epilepsy, which causes significant developmental delays.

The World Health Organization Announcement About Cannabidiol Is Big News For People With Epilepsy, But More Research Needs To Be Done

Marijuana’s effect on the body has garnered more and more interest as it becomes legal for medical and recreational use in different states. People who are against marijuana legalization cite the potential for addiction and other dangerous side effects, but a new report may debunk this popularly-held belief. On Dec. 13, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that a cannabis compound called cannabidiol (CBD) “could have therapeutic value” for epilepsy-related seizures. Additionally, the WHO says that CBD is not likely to be misused or create dependence, unlike other cannabis compounds like Tetra Hydro Cannabinol (THC).

Cannabis and Epilepsy Treatment

Since medicinal cannabis has become a more commonplace alternative for a well-established list of ailments, patients are finding a place for it next to their Advil and Tums. But unlike many other chronic illnesses that can be managed with over-the-counter supplements, epilepsy requires a specific cocktail of chemicals not readily available at the local corner store.

Zynerba’s cannabis-based epilepsy gel fails in phase 2 trial

Zynerba Pharmaceuticals has reported that its cannabis-based epilepsy gel ZYN002 (cannabidiol [CBD] gel) has failed to meet the primary point in a phase 2 clinical trial. The trial dubbed as STAR 1 was held in 188 adult epilepsy patients with focal seizures across 14 sites in Australia and New Zealand. When compared to placebo, ZYN002 during the treatment period could not show a statistically significant decrease in focal seizures in comparison to the baseline period for either the high or low dose cohorts. STAR expands to Synthetic Transdermal Cannabidiol for the Treatment of Epilepsy. The patients in the phase 2 trial were randomized to be treated during a 12-week period for every 12 hours with either 195mg of ZYN002 4.2% CBD gel, 97.5mg of ZYN002 4.2% CBD gel or placebo gel. The primary...

Compound derived from marijuana interacts with anti-epileptic drugs

New research published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggests that an investigational neurological treatment derived from cannabis may alter the blood levels of commonly used anti-epileptic drugs. It is important for clinicians to consider such drug interactions during treatment of complex conditions.

Cannabis compound quells seizures in severe epilepsy syndrom

A component of marijuana called cannabidiol eased seizures in children with Dravet syndrome, a potentially fatal form of epilepsy, in a late-stage clinical trial1. Dravet syndrome stems from mutations in sodium channels, most often in a gene called SCN1A. A gene in the same family, SCN2A, is a top autism candidate. About one in four children with Dravet syndrome also has an autism diagnosis. Many children with Dravet syndrome take multiple epilepsy drugs to control their severe seizures. But some children do not respond to the drugs. Some parents of children with Dravet syndrome or autism turn to marijuana, based purely on anecdotal evidence. The new study is the first rigorous trial to show that purified cannabidiol decreases seizures in children with epilepsy. “It’s a huge milestone,” sa...

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