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AED’s

Existing anti-inflammatory drugs may be effective in treating epilepsy

In epileptic patients, seizures lead to an increased level of inflammation-related proteins called chemokines in the brain, and systemic inflammation likely helps trigger and promote the recurrence of seizures, making inflammation a promising new target for anticonvulsant therapy. The latest evidence on one particular chemokine of interest, CCL2, and its potential role in human epilepsy are the focus of an article in DNA and Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers (http://www.liebertpub.com/).

Children with Epilepsy in Malaysia Show Vitamin-D Deficiency

Long-term use of antiepileptic drugs is a significant risk factor for vitamin D deficiency in children with epilepsy. A new Epilepsia study found that despite living in the tropics, a high proportion of Malaysian children with epilepsy are at risk of vitamin D deficiency. Among 244 children, vitamin D deficiency was identified in 55 (22.5%) of patients, and a further 48 (19.7%) had vitamin D insufficiency. Children with multiple antiepileptic drugs, low sunshine exposure, Indian ethnicity, female sex, and age >12 years were more likely to be vitamin D deficient. Source: Wiley

Epilepsy drug exposure does not increase newborn orofacial cleft risk

Pregnant women with epilepsy should not rule out continuing lamotrigine therapy due to concerns that exposure could increase the risk of orofacial clefts (OCs) in their babies, say investigators. Their findings indicate that the excess risk of OC is less than one in every 550 babies exposed to lamotrigine and therefore they do not support the sixfold increased risk suggested by the North American antiepileptic drug registry in 2006, a signal that led to warnings of the risk being added to patient information.

Generics Compared Against Each Other, No Difference Found

Study confirms no detectable difference when switching between generics While approved generics are required to be equivalent to their brand-named counterparts in terms of active ingredients, some may wonder if a switch between generics could cause problems for someone who relies on daily medication to control a severe, chronic condition, like seizures. A new study led by Michael Privitera, MD, professor of the Department of Neurology and director of the Epilepsy Center at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute, tested two generic lamotrigine (prescription antiepileptic) products and found no detectable difference in clinical effects among patients in the trial. The findings were published this week in an advance online edition of The Lancet Neurology.

Running May Prevent Side Effects of AEDs

The simple act of running may be sufficient to prevent long-term cognitive impairments caused by prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs, according to a study published November 19th in Stem Cell Reports, the journal of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. The findings revealed that prenatal exposure to a commonly used antiepileptic drug called valproic acid (VPA) inhibited the birth of new neurons in the brains of adult mice and impaired their performance on learning and memory tasks. Remarkably, these postnatal side effects were largely prevented when the mice were given access to a running wheel at a young age.

Epilepsy Drug VS Acupuncture for Hot Flashes – Which is more effective?

The results might surprise you! Acupuncture: A viable treatment for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off-limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. The results of the study are published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Over 400 New Neurological Drugs in Development

America’s biopharmaceutical research companies are currently developing 420 medicines for patients suffering from neurological disorders, including epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s disease. As highlighted in a new report from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) and the Epilepsy Foundation, scientists around the globe are collaborating to find new or more effective treatments for patients with these complex disorders that attack the nervous system. “Researchers have made tremendous advances in understanding how the nervous system works at the molecular and genetic levels which in turn has translated into the development of more effective treatments for neurological disorders,” said John J. Caste...

New Drug To Provide Relief for Epilepsy and Tinnitus

A new drug may treat epilepsy and prevent tinnitus by selectively affecting potassium channels in the brain, UConn neurophysiologist Anastasios Tzingounis and colleagues report in the 10 June Journal of Neuroscience.d Epilepsy and tinnitus are both caused by overly excitable nerve cells. Healthy nerves have a built-in system that slams on the brakes when they get too excited. But in some people this braking system doesn’t work, and the nerves run amok, signaling so much that the brain gets overloaded and has a seizure (epilepsy) or hears phantom ringing (tinnitus). About 65 million people worldwide are affected by epilepsy. The numbers on tinnitus are not as clearcut, but the American Tinnutus Association estimates 2 million people have tinnitus so disabling they have troubling funct...

Seizure Frequency and Number of AEDs Play Role in Risk Factors for SUDEP

SUDEP is the most common “direct epilepsy-related” cause of death in persons with epilepsy. While the risk for is still relatively low for all patients, our understanding of SUDEP is also relatively low. Researchers in Korea recently conducted and published a study that investigates clinical variables in correlation with SUDEP in order to identify risk factors. Twenty-six SUDEP cases and 78 controls were included in the study. 

Ketogenic Diet and Enzyme Inhibitors Treat Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

SOURCE – One percent of the world’s population suffer from epilepsy, and a third of sufferers cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Diet control has been used to treat patients suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy since the 1920s, but how metabolic processes affect epilepsy has not been fully understood. Now researchers at Okayama University and Kawasaki Medical School have identified the metabolic pathways altered by diet treatments, the enzymes that can control them and potential metabolic drugs that may be effective for treating types of epilepsy that are resistant to other drugs.

Epilepsy Drugs Could Be Used To Prevent Or Treat Symptoms Of Alzheimer’s Disease

With the lack of reliable treatment for Alzheimer’s disease today, neurologists have focused their attention on treating the disease or at the very least delaying its onset. A recent study conducted at the University of British Columbia has found that drugs used to prevent or reduce the severity of epileptic seizures, also known as anticonvulsants, could become a promising treatment option for patients with Alzheimer’s as well. “Now we have many different research groups using antiepileptic drugs that engage the same target, and all point to a therapeutic effect in both Alzheimer’s disease models and patients with the disease,” Dr. Haakon Nygaard, the Fipke Professor in Alzheimer’s Research in UBC’s Faculty of Medicine, said in a statement.

Finding a Switch for Epilepsy

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes, Filters Genese for “Switch” An international team of scientists together with the University of Bonn Hospital have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the “main perpetrators” using a computer model. In doing so, they discovered the molecule sestrin-3 as a central switch. In animal models, the scientists were able to demonstrate that inhibition of sestrin-3 leads to a reduction in seizures. The results are now being presented in the journal Nature Communications. During an epileptic seizure, many nerve cells lose their regular rhythm and switch into a rapid rhythm. This results in seizures to the point ...

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