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Reduction of “Tau” Protein in the Brain Blocks Development of Dravet Syndrome

Reduction of “Tau” Protein in the Brain Blocks Development of Dravet Syndrome

mouse-lab-rat-101117-02In this article posted on Medical Express, research is presented that supports a theory that reducing brain levels of tau protein can effectively block the development of Dravet Syndrome in lab-mouse studies. The treatment not only suppressed seizure activity and prolonged life, but also improved abnormal behavior and cognition that can accompany the syndrome.

Excerpt:

Previous studies from this group have shown that lowering tau levels reduces abnormal brain activity in models of Alzheimer’s disease, but this is the first demonstration that tau reduction may also be beneficial in intractable genetic epilepsy.

“It would really be wonderful if tau reduction turned out to be useful not only in Alzheimer’s disease, but also in other disabling neurological conditions for which there currently are no effective treatments,” said senior author Lennart Mucke, MD, the director of the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease and a professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco. “We suspected that this approach might be beneficial in Dravet, but we couldn’t be sure because of the severity of this syndrome and the corresponding model. We are thrilled that our strategy was so effective, but a lot more work is needed to advance it into the clinic.”

Dravet syndrome is one of the most challenging forms of , resulting from a specific genetic mutation that affects sodium channels in the brain. Frequent, relentless seizures are accompanied by cognitive impairments and behavioral problems similar to autism, and up to 20% of patients succumb to sudden death. Current treatments for Dravet syndrome are largely ineffective, making research into the disorder particularly urgent.

“I am especially excited about the improvements we observed in cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions because these abnormalities are particularly hard on the kids—and their parents,” said first author Ania Gheyara, MD, PhD, a staff scientist at Gladstone who is also affiliated with the UCSF Department of Pathology. “Our hope is that this approach will be broadly applicable to many different types of epilepsy.”

Read the Full article: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-08-reduction-tau-protein-symptoms-severe.html

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