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INSIDE STORY: Girl’s Life With Epilepsy Inspires Florida’s Medical Marijuana Bill

INSIDE STORY: Girl’s Life With Epilepsy Inspires Florida’s Medical Marijuana Bill
Holley Moseley walks to the park with daughter RayAnn, 11, in their neighborhood in Gulf Breeze. RayAnn, who has severe epilepsy, was an inspiration for the Florida Legislature's passage of a bill that soon will allow parents to treat their epileptic children with marijuana that contains a low amount of THC, the chemical that causes intoxication.

Holley Moseley walks to the park with daughter RayAnn, 11, in their neighborhood in Gulf Breeze. RayAnn, who has severe epilepsy, was an inspiration for the Florida Legislature’s passage of a bill that soon will allow parents to treat their epileptic children with marijuana that contains a low amount of THC, the chemical that causes intoxication.

Holley Moseley walks to the park with daughter RayAnn, 11, in their neighborhood in Gulf Breeze. RayAnn, who has severe epilepsy, was an inspiration for the Florida Legislature’s passage of a bill that soon will allow parents to treat their epileptic children with marijuana that contains a low amount of THC, the chemical that causes intoxication.

GULF BREEZE | On good days when her epileptic seizures aren’t severe, RayAnn Moseley laughs, sings, dances, swims and practices with the children’s choir at her church. She easily brings smiles to the people around her.

On bad days, the 11-year-old wakes up in bloody sheets or lies down on the school floor and says nothing all day. When her seizures become particularly intense, she is rushed to the hospital.

The images of those extremes collected in a collage helped persuade Florida lawmakers to support a bill that soon will allow parents to treat their epileptic children with marijuana that has a low amount of THC, the chemical that causes intoxication. What seemed improbable a few months ago is about to become a law with the help of a girl whose story melted hearts.

“When we first started this, people were like, ‘Are you crazy? It’s never going to pass,'” said RayAnn’s father, Peyton Moseley, who, along with his wife, Holley, met with dozens of lawmakers showing them photos of RayAnn.

“They could see the difference when she’s having good days as opposed to when she’s having bad days. It helped to really put a face on it.”

Even Gov. Rick Scott, who has firmly opposed medical marijuana, welcomed RayAnn into his office, hugged her and assured her parents he would sign the bill, which passed the Legislature overwhelmingly on the last day of the 2014 ses­sion.

Once he does, strains of marijuana with low amounts of THC and high amounts of cannabidiol, or CBD, which is used to treat seizures, will be legal in Florida for certain medical conditions.

CONTINUE READING: http://www.theledger.com/article/20140608/NEWS/140609266?p=2&tc=pg

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