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Women and Epilepsy

First ‘Bachelorette’ Trista Sutter still doesn’t know what caused scary seizure

The first “Bachelorette” Trista Sutter continues to live with unanswered questions about her health, after suffering some kind of seizure while vacationing with her family in Croatia last month. The 44-year-old mother of two opened up about her heath scare in an interview Tuesday morning on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” With her husband Ryan Sutter by her side, she said she had no symptoms of illness before the seizure. She said she has enjoyed a healthy and active lifestyle. Her only health problems, if you can call them that, have been the occasional headache.

Why do epilepsy drugs don’t work for some women? Scientists find out

A variation in a gene is responsible for some women to suffer from frequent epileptic seizures despite taking anti-epileptic drugs Effective treatment is available for epilepsy, but doctors had found out that epilepsy drugs don’t work in some women. Now scientists have figured out why some women suffer from recurrent seizures despite medication.

Pregnancy weight linked to epilepsy: study

Babies born to severely obese, or grade III obesity, was associated with an 82 per cent increased risk of epilepsy.   A study of almost 1.5 million children has found the risk of epilepsy almost doubled among those born to severely obese mothers.   Being overweight during the first trimester of pregnancy has been linked to an increased risk of childhood epilepsy.   A Swedish study of almost 1.5 million babies found the risk of epilepsy almost doubled from normal-weight women to very severely obese women.   Epilepsy disrupts the normal electrochemical activity of the brain resulting seizures.   The cause of this debilitating and often hard-to-treat condition is poorly understood.   With obesity on the rise, there is growing concern about the long-term neurological effects of children expose...

Hormone therapy may not protect women from Alzheimer’s disease, new study shows

The latest study on hormone therapy and Alzheimer’s disease shows no relationship between taking the drugs and whether you may develop the disease years later.

RAISING SUDEP AWARENESS IN PEDIATRIC EPILEPSY

This article appears in the AAP News and Journals Gateway Increasing Awareness of Sudden Death in Pediatric Epilepsy Together Gardiner Lapham, William Davis Gaillard, Joanna Sexter, Madison M. Berl The death of any child is tragic. When the death is sudden and unexpected, it can seem especially incomprehensible. Henry was 4 years old when he died only a few weeks after his epilepsy diagnosis; his parents were devastated and never knew that death could occur; no physician had discussed the possibility with them. Henry was an otherwise healthy child, had a history of febrile seizures, and died in his sleep before his epilepsy workup was complete and before his medication was likely therapeutic. Since Henry’s death 8 years ago, together and independently, Henry’s parents, pediatrician, and ne...

Extremely Low AED Levels Found in Breastfed Infants of Mothers with Epilepsy

In a prospective study of women with epilepsy, researchers found blood levels of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in their breastfed infants to be either undetectable or well below the therapeutic range. They reported the findings here Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. 

Connection found between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

A new study undertaken jointly by researchers from the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and European researchers, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, exposes a new biological mechanism that, on the one hand, damages a very specific type of memory, but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy.

Sodium channel gene takes diverging paths in autism, epilepsy

Mutations in a gene called SCN2A have opposite effects in autism and in epilepsy. The divergence makes the gene an attractive candidate for research, suggest unpublished results presented today at the 2016 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego.

Maternal linked to childhood epilepsy

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease whereby the body’s own immune system attacks the joints. New research suggests there may be a link between mothers with the autoimmune disorder and their children who develop epilepsy.

Understanding Stroke Risk in Pregnancy

A New York State study found that younger, not older women suffered an increase risk of stroke, both during pregnancy and in postpartum. Younger women — not older women — had an increased risk of stroke during pregnancy and the postpartum period compared to non-pregnant women of the same age, according to the results of a new study published online October 24, 2016 in JAMA Neurology. Overall, pregnancy-associated stroke (PAS) accounted for 15 percent of strokes in women aged 12 to 24 years; 20 percent of strokes in women aged 25 to 34 years; 5 percent of strokes in women aged 35 to 44 years; and 0.05 percent of strokes in women aged 45 to 50 years.

Researchers propose new explanation for symptoms of fragile X syndrome

  Until recently, scientists thought they understood one of the underlying causes of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability in the United States. The syndrome, which is associated with autism, was believed to be linked primarily to overactivity in a molecular pathway in the brain. But then, in 2014, two large-scale, multinational clinical trials aimed at treating fragile X by inhibiting that pathway failed.

Study shows continuous electrical stimulation suppresses seizures in patients with epilepsy

When surgery and medication don’t help people with epilepsy, electrical stimulation of the brain has been a treatment of last resort. Unfortunately, typical approaches, such as vagal nerve stimulation or responsive nerve stimulation, rarely stop seizures altogether. But a new Mayo Clinic study in JAMA Neurology shows that seizures were suppressed in patients treated with continuous electrical stimulation. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted. In the study, 13 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were deemed unsuitable for resective surgery, which removes a portion of the brain — usually about the size of a golf ball — that was causing seizures. When patients are evaluated for surgery, a grid of electrical contacts ...

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