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Women and Epilepsy

Children born to mothers with arthritis are 160% more likely to have epilepsy

Conclusion from a study of 1.4 million births.   They are also three times as likely to develop the agonizing condition in later life   Experts say children born to arthritis sufferers should be given ‘special attention’   The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, was derived from 25 years of research  

Association Between Seizure Onset and Year of Menarche in Women With Epilepsy

There is a significant relationship between the age of seizure onset and the age of menarche (the first occurrence of menstruation) in women with epilepsy, according to research presented at the 2017 American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting, held December 1-5, 2017 in Washington, DC.   Researchers gathered data from a web-based survey from the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry of 1144 women aged 18-47 who provided information on demographics, epilepsy diagnosis, antiepileptic drug use, and reproductive and contraceptive use.

Epilepsy drugs pose risks to developing brains, study suggests

Some drugs used to treat epilepsy harm children who are exposed to them in the womb or through breast milk, a new analysis of the literature suggests1. The drug valproate is particularly risky, boosting the likelihood of autism and other developmental problems up to 17-fold. The study is the first to compare the relative risks of taking various epilepsy drugs during pregnancy. Some of these medications are also used to treat bipolar disorder and migraines.

Safety of Antiepileptic Drugs During Pregnancy

A study investigated the association between maternal epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs used during pregnancy, and perinatal outcomes since there is little data comparing perinatal outcomes with or without antiepileptic drug use during pregnancy. Epilepsy is a chronic disorder marked by unpredictable, recurring seizures caused by disruptions in nerve cell activity in the brain.  During a seizure, any brain function can be affected.  Once diagnosed, people usually begin treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to reduce the number and duration of their seizures.  However, other health problems such as depression, insomnia, stomach upset, osteoporosis, or eye damage seem to be more prevalent amongst epileptics and it is unknown whether these are related to the disease, the medications, or both....

Estrogen-mediated brain protection directly linked to intake of of fatty acids found in oils

Scientists are increasingly appreciating estrogen’s role in brain health. Now for the first time, production of estrogen in the brain has been directly linked to the presence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). DHA is found in abundance in fish oils and is also synthesized from alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid found in some vegetable-based oils.

This Is What It’s Really Like to Have Epilepsy

Epilepsy nearly took Emily Borghard’s life before she was diagnosed—she’s not only learned to live with the condition, but thrive as well. For Emily Borghard, 28, life growing up on a farm in upstate New York was filled with carefree activities in her close-knit community. Volunteer work with local soccer programs took up much of her time, and when her first seizure hit, she was a senior in high school applying for college admission miles away from home. Epilepsy causes seizures as a result of unusual electrical activity in the brain, usually due to brain injury though often it has no identifiable cause. “My first seizure occurred during a car accident. I was going home after a sleepover with my friends and I drove right off the road into a creek. I live in such a small town th...

First ‘Bachelorette’ Trista Sutter still doesn’t know what caused scary seizure

The first “Bachelorette” Trista Sutter continues to live with unanswered questions about her health, after suffering some kind of seizure while vacationing with her family in Croatia last month. The 44-year-old mother of two opened up about her heath scare in an interview Tuesday morning on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” With her husband Ryan Sutter by her side, she said she had no symptoms of illness before the seizure. She said she has enjoyed a healthy and active lifestyle. Her only health problems, if you can call them that, have been the occasional headache.

Why do epilepsy drugs don’t work for some women? Scientists find out

A variation in a gene is responsible for some women to suffer from frequent epileptic seizures despite taking anti-epileptic drugs Effective treatment is available for epilepsy, but doctors had found out that epilepsy drugs don’t work in some women. Now scientists have figured out why some women suffer from recurrent seizures despite medication.

Pregnancy weight linked to epilepsy: study

Babies born to severely obese, or grade III obesity, was associated with an 82 per cent increased risk of epilepsy.   A study of almost 1.5 million children has found the risk of epilepsy almost doubled among those born to severely obese mothers.   Being overweight during the first trimester of pregnancy has been linked to an increased risk of childhood epilepsy.   A Swedish study of almost 1.5 million babies found the risk of epilepsy almost doubled from normal-weight women to very severely obese women.   Epilepsy disrupts the normal electrochemical activity of the brain resulting seizures.   The cause of this debilitating and often hard-to-treat condition is poorly understood.   With obesity on the rise, there is growing concern about the long-term neurological effects of children expose...

Hormone therapy may not protect women from Alzheimer’s disease, new study shows

The latest study on hormone therapy and Alzheimer’s disease shows no relationship between taking the drugs and whether you may develop the disease years later.

RAISING SUDEP AWARENESS IN PEDIATRIC EPILEPSY

This article appears in the AAP News and Journals Gateway Increasing Awareness of Sudden Death in Pediatric Epilepsy Together Gardiner Lapham, William Davis Gaillard, Joanna Sexter, Madison M. Berl The death of any child is tragic. When the death is sudden and unexpected, it can seem especially incomprehensible. Henry was 4 years old when he died only a few weeks after his epilepsy diagnosis; his parents were devastated and never knew that death could occur; no physician had discussed the possibility with them. Henry was an otherwise healthy child, had a history of febrile seizures, and died in his sleep before his epilepsy workup was complete and before his medication was likely therapeutic. Since Henry’s death 8 years ago, together and independently, Henry’s parents, pediatrician, and ne...

Extremely Low AED Levels Found in Breastfed Infants of Mothers with Epilepsy

In a prospective study of women with epilepsy, researchers found blood levels of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in their breastfed infants to be either undetectable or well below the therapeutic range. They reported the findings here Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. 

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