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Ultra-Marathon Cyclist Who Is Epileptic Breaks Two World Indoor Distance Records

An ultra-marathon cyclist with epilepsy has broken world indoor-track records for the longest distances covered in six and eight hours. Katie Ford dedicated the records she broke on July 2 at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow’s Emirates Arena to raising epilepsy awareness.

Opinion: It’s time to bring epilepsy awareness out of the dark ages

It is one of the most common brain ailments, affecting over 65 million people globally, and yet it remains shrouded in stigma and ignorance. Epilepsy: a disease that is as old as civilization itself. According to Epilepsy Canada, tablets regarding medical records from Babylonia dating to 2000 BC accurately describe the different types of epileptic seizures. In Canada, it is estimated that around 139,200 people have epilepsy. The good news is that according to a Statistics Canada survey, 39 per cent of those living independently with epilepsy say it does not affect their life at all. An estimated 44 per cent suggest that epilepsy has little or only a moderate effect on their lives. However, 18 per cent say that epilepsy has affected them quite a bit. The bad news is that in the same survey,...

First ‘Bachelorette’ Trista Sutter still doesn’t know what caused scary seizure

The first “Bachelorette” Trista Sutter continues to live with unanswered questions about her health, after suffering some kind of seizure while vacationing with her family in Croatia last month. The 44-year-old mother of two opened up about her heath scare in an interview Tuesday morning on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” With her husband Ryan Sutter by her side, she said she had no symptoms of illness before the seizure. She said she has enjoyed a healthy and active lifestyle. Her only health problems, if you can call them that, have been the occasional headache.

Dr. Joseph Sirven: Two Sides Of Hope

My patient’s mom drops a 500-page collection of internet pages that she had printed in front of me. It’s meticulously researched and indexed about her daughter’s rare epilepsy condition. “Dr. Sirven, this is light reading for your lunches this week and maybe dinners too,” she said. “I hope your wife doesn’t mind.”

Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood: A Physicians’ Guide for Diagnosis

Alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is a rare genetic disorder that involves both paroxysmal and chronic neurological symptoms, and its name comes from the recurrent attacks of hemiplegia. Attacks have been known to affect either side in the same patient at different times, or even during the same attack (“alternating”). Beyond that, AHC patients can have paroxysmal attacks involving a wide variety of other abnormalities of movement, including dystonia, quadriplegia, nystagmus, and gaze palsy, and  autonomic symptoms. The paroxysmal symptoms resolve with sleep, but may recur after the child awakens.

Epilepsy and natural treatments: Can they help?

Epilepsy is a disease that disrupts the electrical activity of the nervous system, causing seizures. More than 65 million people in the world have epilepsy. 1 in 26 Americans will develop the disease during their lives. Children are the group most frequently diagnosed with new cases of epilepsy. In the United States, 300,000 children under 14 are affected by the condition. Some may outgrow the disorder, but most will not. The number of senior citizens with epilepsy is also 300,000. People with epilepsy have a range of treatment options, including alternative therapies. The illness is a complex condition, however, and all alternative treatment options must be looked at carefully, to ensure they are effective. Causes of epilepsy Epilepsy is a complex disease that can disrupt the electrical a...

Bad Weather May Increase Risk of Seizures in People with Epilepsy, Study Suggests

Low pressure and high humidity—conditions associated with thunderstorms—may put people with epilepsy at higher risk of a seizure. That’s according to a study published online on May 28 in Epilepsia.

Clinically Differentiating Seizure from Syncope

Differentiating between syncope and seizures, a relatively easy task, is not quite so simple in the Emergency Departments. Transient loss of consciousness can occur from seizure or syncope, and the emergency clinician must distinguish between the two general conditions, especially if it’s the patient’s first episode, and direct the appropriate initial evaluation and follow-up. If one concludes that the event was syncope, it’s usually from a cardiovascular event, and some can be serious or even fatal – (and not epilepsy).

Left and Right Brain—The Surprising Truth

Neuroscientists and psychologists all around the world have put great effort into investigating the functions and differences of the left and right brain. The existence of differences between left brain and right brain have been proven by many studies. Especially valuable are the observations that have been made on brain injuries. In this article, you will learn everything about the left brain vs. right brain, including their functions and characteristics.

How to Choose a Medical Alert System

As technology advances, the range of options has grown! I have had many caregivers, parents and loved ones, ask me over the years what kind of Medical Alert/Monitoring Systems are there for someone with epilepsy.  Yes, some do work for a person with epilepsy.  There are a wide range of them today you can research and look at from personal emergency response systems, sleep monitors, watches and more that can offer piece of mind.

Yeast extract may boost brain function

Researchers suggest that Marmite may benefit brain function. Marmite is far from one of the most popular foods in the United States. In fact, many Americans are unlikely to have heard of it. A new study, however, suggests that when it comes to boosting brain function, Marmite triumphs over peanut butter.

How to Prevent Bullying of Children with Epilepsy, Other Medical Conditions

These strategies just might save a life. Bullying can be a serious problem for any child, but for children with a medical challengesuch as epilepsy, the risk is increased. Knowing the facts about bullying is the first step toward preventing victimization of children and teens with epilepsy or other medical conditions, and keeping them safe. What exactly is bullying, and how does it affect the children involved? Bullying consists of aggressive behaviors that are repeated over time and involve an abuse of power by the perpetrator. It may take the form of verbal or physical abuse, or, especially for girls, cyberbullying through social media. The child who bullies learns how to use power and aggression to control and distress another, and the child who is victimized learns about losing power a...

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