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Adjunctive Everolimus Reduces Seizure Frequency in Tuberous Sclerosis

Adjunctive everolimus therapy is safe and effective for reducing the frequency of seizures in pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), according to a post-hoc analysis of a phase 3, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study published in the May 23 online edition of The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.   Epileptic seizures in TSC are difficult to treat, because most patients become treatment refractory. Typically, the onset of epilepsy occurs during infancy and early childhood, which makes treatment decisions difficult.

Prediction method for epileptic seizures developed

Epileptic seizures strike with little warning and nearly one third of people living with epilepsy are resistant to treatment that controls these attacks. More than 65 million people worldwide are living with epilepsy.

Social Security Probed For Disability Case Delays

A lack of support staff, low morale and bad management are being cited by a government watchdog report as reasons for problems that the Social Security Administration (SSA) is having in providing adequate customer service to the millions of individuals who rely on its benefits.   For years, the SSA has faced criticisms for the lengthy delays on hearings for disability and other types of benefits. A new report by the agency’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) investigated issues involving how long it takes for disability and other cases that require hearings to be processed.

Advanced brain scanner allows neuroimaging in moving subjects

A new innovation in brain scanner technology promises high-resolution neuroimaging in subjects without restricting their head and body movements. Neurons are specialized cells that are designed to generate electrochemical signals. These signals are the currency used to transmit information across the body. Neurons connect the brain, spinal cord, and each nook and cranny of our body to form information highways, transmitting sensory and motor information to different cells and other neurons in the body in the form of electrical impulses. Electrical currents also produce a magnetic field, proportional to the magnitude of the current that is producing it.

Personalizing therapeutic brain stimulation

Research could inform development of individualized stimulation protocols for neuropsychiatric disorders   A study of epilepsy patients with implanted electrodes provides an unprecedented view of the changes in brain activity created by electrical stimulation. These findings, published in JNeurosci, have the potential to improve noninvasive stimulation approaches toward the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.   Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used in patients with disorders such as depression that do not respond well to medication or psychotherapy. Although the effects of stimulation on the motor cortex have been characterized in animal models and humans, its effects on other brain areas — including the prefrontal cortex, the target ...

Researchers discover novel mode of neurotransmitter-based communication

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the first example of a novel mode of neurotransmitter-based communication. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, challenges current dogma about mechanisms of signaling in the brain, and uncovers new pathways for developing therapies for disorders like epilepsy, anxiety and chronic pain.

Call to action builds on 2015 WHO Resolution on Epilepsy, which aims to improve knowledge, services, and treatment of epilepsy worldwide

Representatives from the International League against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the International Bureau for Epilepsy (IBE), alongside prominent members of the Global epilepsy community, are meeting this week to encourage World Health Assembly (WHA) members and the World Health Organization (WHO) to continue to recognize epilepsy as a global health priority in countries around the world.   Coinciding with the 71st World Health Assembly, advocates will focus on progressing the milestone 2015 WHO Resolution on epilepsy to encourage countries to prioritize epilepsy at national levels, including promoting awareness, eliminating stigma of the disease, expanding research capacity, improving monitoring and surveillance, and expanding access to care.   One of the particular areas of focus will...

Mechanism underlying malformation associated with severe epilepsy is revealed

Study suggests dysregulation of gene NEUROG2 could be linked to development of focal cortical dysplasia, one of the most common causes of drug-resistant epilepsy   One of the most frequent causes of drug-resistant epilepsy, considered a difficult disease to control, is a brain malformation known as focal cortical dysplasia.   Patients with this problem present with discreet disorganization in the architecture of a specific region of the cortex, which may or may not be associated with the presence of nerve cells that have structural and functional abnormalities.

With Epilepsy on The Rise, Thousands of Americans Are Turning To The Internet For Advice

Epilepsy is on the rise in the USA, recent figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirm. According to a 2018 report issued by the CDC, “Active Epilepsy and Seizure Control in Adults — United States, 2013 and 2015”, the number of Americans self-reporting epilepsy rose from 2.3 million in 2010, to approximately 3 million in 2015. A 1994 report — Current Trends Prevalence of Self-Reported Epilepsy, United States, 1986-1990 — estimated that the number of Americans with self reported epilepsy was just 1.1 million at the time. Why we built the 100% non-profit EpilepsyU.com for U www.EpilepsyU.com reaches an average of 1.3 million visitors each month!) An increasing number of Americans are utilizing the internet for advice about their condition highlighting the...

Child Protective Services called on parents treating kid with CBD oil for epilepsy

Photo: Jaelah Jerger (L) and Vala Jerger (R) (Photo courtesy their mother.)   Indiana allows CBD oil for epilepsy, but the girl’s particular form of epilepsy is not protected.   It all began last August. Even though the laws in Indiana for cannabis are strict, the Jergers knew there were certain laws permitting CBD oil use for epilepsy patients. Concerned about the side-effects of antiepileptic drug Keppra, they decided to try CBD oil to help with their daughter Jaelah’s seizures, ordering it from a company in Colorado. Then, unexpectedly, Child Protective Services showed up at their door.

Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Treatment Commences Clinical Trial Recruitment

This week, AMO Pharma Limited announced the commencement of patient recruitment for an interventional study of AMO-01, an investigational Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor for the treatment of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS).   “Treatment of Phelan-McDermid syndrome represents a significant area of unmet need in healthcare, and AMO Pharma is grateful to the research team at Mt. Sinai as well as the Phelan McDermid Syndrome Foundation for their commitment to this landmark research effort,” said Michael Snape, PhD, CEO of AMO Pharma. “Research thus far indicates that AMO-01 could have important applications in the treatment of patients living with Phelan-McDermid syndrome in the years ahead.”

FDA Reports a Life-Threatening Immune Reaction to Lamotrigine: What You Should Know

A rare but life-threatening immune reaction in response to lamotrigine (Lamictal) requires prompt diagnosis and treatment, according to a recent alert from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).   On April 25, the FDA issued what it calls a “drug safety communication” about the risk of a condition so rare that few neurologists have heard of it: hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a systematic immune reaction that can result in organ failure and death if not quickly treated.   Just eight such cases associated with lamotrigine, including one death, are known by the FDA to have occurred since the drug was first approved in 1994 as a treatment for epilepsy. Since then, it has also been approved for bipolar disorder, and is now increasingly prescribed off-label...

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