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Ultra-Marathon Cyclist Who Is Epileptic Breaks Two World Indoor Distance Records

An ultra-marathon cyclist with epilepsy has broken world indoor-track records for the longest distances covered in six and eight hours. Katie Ford dedicated the records she broke on July 2 at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow’s Emirates Arena to raising epilepsy awareness.

Valproic Acid Concentration Drops With Ketogenic Diet

For patients with epilepsy, anti-epileptic drug serum concentrations remain stable during the ketogenic diet, apart from those of valproic acid, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. Changes in serum concentrations of other anti-epileptic drugs not found to be significant. For patients with epilepsy, anti-epileptic drug serum concentrations remain stable during the ketogenic diet (KD), apart from those of valproic acid, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

Epilepsy Patients More Likely to Have Been Abused as Children, Study Finds

Childhood abuse, both sexual and emotional, is more frequently reported in epilepsy patients when compared to the general population, according to the results of a German study. These findings are in agreement with previous studies and highlight the need for additional vigilance on the familiar settings of children with epilepsy.

First ‘Bachelorette’ Trista Sutter still doesn’t know what caused scary seizure

The first “Bachelorette” Trista Sutter continues to live with unanswered questions about her health, after suffering some kind of seizure while vacationing with her family in Croatia last month. The 44-year-old mother of two opened up about her heath scare in an interview Tuesday morning on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” With her husband Ryan Sutter by her side, she said she had no symptoms of illness before the seizure. She said she has enjoyed a healthy and active lifestyle. Her only health problems, if you can call them that, have been the occasional headache.

Epilepsy and natural treatments: Can they help?

Epilepsy is a disease that disrupts the electrical activity of the nervous system, causing seizures. More than 65 million people in the world have epilepsy. 1 in 26 Americans will develop the disease during their lives. Children are the group most frequently diagnosed with new cases of epilepsy. In the United States, 300,000 children under 14 are affected by the condition. Some may outgrow the disorder, but most will not. The number of senior citizens with epilepsy is also 300,000. People with epilepsy have a range of treatment options, including alternative therapies. The illness is a complex condition, however, and all alternative treatment options must be looked at carefully, to ensure they are effective. Causes of epilepsy Epilepsy is a complex disease that can disrupt the electrical a...

New Selfie Danger? Camera Flash May Trigger Seizure-Like Response

Snapping a selfie may come with an unwanted side effect, at least for one teen. In a recent case report from Canada, doctors saw seizure-like activity in a teen’s brainwaves just after the teen took a selfie. The doctors who treated the teen called the phenomenon “selfie-epilepsy,” according to the report, which was published in February in the journal Seizure.

Bad Weather May Increase Risk of Seizures in People with Epilepsy, Study Suggests

Low pressure and high humidity—conditions associated with thunderstorms—may put people with epilepsy at higher risk of a seizure. That’s according to a study published online on May 28 in Epilepsia.

Distinct wiring mode found in chandelier cells

Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience identify the wiring process of a unique type of inhibitory cells implicated in several diseases. A basic tenet of neural development is that young neurons make far more connections than they will actually use, with very little specificity. They selectively maintain only the ones that they end up needing. Once many of these connections are made, the brain employs a use-it or lose-it strategy; if the organism’s subsequent experiences stimulate the synapse, it will strengthen and survive. If not, the synapse will weaken and eventually disappear.

Secret of Epilepsy Discovered in Jerusalem?

Unable to figure out what causes the neurological disorder, the scientists thought to ask: What causes normal people (or lab animals) not to have it? Epileptic seizures are caused by abnormal activity in our brain. We know that. Attacks can be unprovoked or can be the result from a tendency that is created, for instance, by head trauma or exposure to certain stimuli. We know that too. We don’t know, however, is why some people are prone to epilepsy and some are not.

Did ‘Pokemon’ Actually Give Kids Seizures In the 90s?

An investigation. Parents have always been a little concerned about their kids watching cartoons. They worry that their children watch cartoons too often, or the shows are violent. But what if a cartoon had the power to actually hurt your kid? That was the situation in December 1997, when an episode of Pokémon aired in Japan and tens of thousands of children reportedly experienced seizures—a phenomenon dubbed the “Pokémon shock.” The episode caused widespread panic and the show went on a four-month hiatus, nearly getting cancelled. But years later, a researcher discovered that the story may have become more dangerous than the episode itself. “Doctors were baffled by it,” said Benjamin Radford, the investigator who co-authored a paper on the phenomenon. “That w...

Studies of epilepsy patients uncover clues to how the brain remembers

In a pair of studies, scientists at the National Institutes of Health explored how the human brain stores and retrieves memories. One study suggests that the brain etches each memory into unique firing patterns of individual neurons. Meanwhile, the second study The studies were led by Kareem Zaghloul, M.D., Ph.D., a neurosurgeon-researcher at the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Persons with drug resistant epilepsy in protocols studying surgical resection of their seizure focus at the NIH’s Clinical Center enrolled in this study. To help locate the source of the seizures, Dr. Zaghloul’s team surgically implanted a grid of electrodes into the patients’ brains and monitored electrical activity for several days.

Gene find could lead to treatment for epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease

A study conducted in the US has hit upon a new strategy to identify genes that underlie specific brain processes, and may eventually help scientists develop treatments for patients with memory impairments. More than 100 genes linked to memory have been identified, paving the way for treatments for conditions like epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease.

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