Welcome to EpilepsyU.com a social network dedicated to the epilepsy community

Memory

Electrical brain stimulation found to improve working memory

Scientists may have found a way to improve brain connectivity. The findings may boost short-term working memory, and in the future, they may help to repair brain damage in patients with traumatic brain injury, stroke, or epilepsy.

First Guideline on Presurgical Brain Mapping for Epilepsy

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has released the first evidence-based guideline comparing procedures used for determining brain lateralization prior to epilepsy surgery and for predicting post-surgical language and memory deficits.

Can Methylphenidate (Ritalin)Treat Cognitive Deficits in Epilepsy?

A study published in Neurology suggests that methylphenidate (Ritalin) may help  some cognitive deficits in patients with epilepsy. To compare the potential efficacy of immediate-release methylphenidate (Ritalin) vs. placebo in treating cognitive deficits in epilepsy, researchers conducted a double-blind, randomized, single-dose, 3-period crossover study (n=35). Patients with epilepsy and chronic cognitive complaints participated in three medication visits (approximately 1 week apart) where they were administered one of the blinded preparations (placebo, methylphenidate 10mg or 20mg).

Puzzle of Impaired Consciousness in Absence Epilepsy Solved?

Intense abnormal activity in well-known brain networks that occurs early in a seizure may be the key to impaired consciousness in children with absence epilepsy, new research suggests.

Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), people also experience major sleep problems, including changes in their sleep-wake cycle. A new study shows that recovering from these two conditions occurs in parallel. The study is published in the December 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Rhythm of breathing influences emotional judgments and memory recall

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered for the first time that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall. These effects on behavior depend critically on whether you inhale or exhale and whether you breathe through the nose or mouth.

Symptom trends may help predict recovery of patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome

Researchers at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre’s (KNC) Canadian Concussion Centre (CCC) have identified symptom trends that may not only help predict how soon patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome (PCS) will recover, but also provide insight on how to treat those who experience persistent concussion symptoms.

Comorbidities Common Even in Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

Co-morbidities in a Hong Kong Cohort People with epilepsy have a higher prevalence of psychiatric and medical comorbid conditions than the general population. Now a recent review of patients with newly diagnosed and treated epilepsy admitted to Hong Kong hospitals has revealed that even patients without a long history of epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality.

Connection found between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

A new study undertaken jointly by researchers from the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and European researchers, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, exposes a new biological mechanism that, on the one hand, damages a very specific type of memory, but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy.

Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

For as long as scientists have been listening in on the activity of the brain, they have been trying to understand the source of its noisy, apparently random, activity. In the past 20 years, “balanced network theory” has emerged to explain this apparent randomness through a balance of excitation and inhibition in recurrently coupled networks of neurons. A team of scientists has extended the balanced model to provide deep and testable predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity. Lead investigators at the University of Pittsburgh say the new model accurately explains experimental findings about the highly variable responses of neurons in the brains of living animals. On Oct. 31, their paper, “The spatial structure of correlated neuronal variability,” was publ...

Nerve Cell Changes Crucial to Making Memories May Aid in Understanding Epilepsy

The acquisition of memories by the brain requires that neurons undergo certain physical changes. In showing exactly how these changes take place, researchers may be closer to understanding how certain diseases of the brain, such as epilepsy, develop. The study, “Autocrine BDNF-TrkB Signalling Within a Single Dendritic Spine,” published in the journal Nature, was conducted by researchers at Duke University and the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience.

Researchers discover a new stage of the development cycle of the human brain

Researchers discover mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex after birth Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. The authors hypothesize that this late-stage migration may play a role in establishing fundamentally human cognitive abilities and that its disruption could underlie a number of neurodevelopmental diseases. Most neurons of the cerebral cortex – the outermost layer of the brain responsible for advanced cognition – migrate outward from their birthplaces deep in the brain to take up their positions within the cortex....

  • 1
  • 2
  • 9

Lost Password

Register