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New Research Shows Promise for Surgery For Specific Epilepsy Cause

Neurology Advisor: Seizure Reduction Likely With Surgery in Nonlesional Neocortical Epilepsy

Seizure Triggers: Research Sheds Lights on How Certain Stimuli Cause Seizures

Why does exposure to rhythmic stimulation at certain frequencies facilitate the occurrence of epileptic seizures?

AVOIDING SIDE EFFECTS: Trial Administers Epilepsy Drugs Directly to the Brain

WORLD-first trial will deliver medication directly into the brain of epilepsy patients to sidestep the ­devastating side-effects of tablets. The pioneering treatment aims to be a game-changer for neurological conditions more widely by getting a drug directly where it is needed. The St Vincent’s Hospital team has implanted a pump in their first ­patient. The pump sends anti-epileptic medication from the stomach, through a tiny tube, into a cavity in the brain where it can diffuse into the areas causing the “electrical storm”. READ FULL STORY: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-epilepsy-trial-delivers-medication-directly-into-brain-to-sidestep-side-effects/news-story/13612af0fd456d18583b60cd16d3102e

Researchers discover a new stage of the development cycle of the human brain

Researchers discover mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex after birth Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. The authors hypothesize that this late-stage migration may play a role in establishing fundamentally human cognitive abilities and that its disruption could underlie a number of neurodevelopmental diseases. Most neurons of the cerebral cortex – the outermost layer of the brain responsible for advanced cognition – migrate outward from their birthplaces deep in the brain to take up their positions within the cortex....

UAB researchers launch first drug study to prevent onset of epilepsy in children with TSC

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have launched the first drug study aimed at preventing or delaying the onset of epilepsy in children with a genetic condition known as tuberous sclerosis complex. UAB is the lead institution and data center for the PREVeNT study, a national, multisite study funded by a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form in many different organs. TSC particularly affects neurologic functions, often leading to seizures, developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism. About 80 percent of children with TSC develop epilepsy within the first three years of life.

Redox biomarker could predict progression of epilepsy

Decreased cysteine/cystine ratio in plasma may serve as a redox biomarker in epilepsy UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO ANSCHUTZ MEDICAL CAMPUS Approximately 2.9 million people in the United States suffer from epilepsy, according to the CDC. For patients living with this diagnosis and their doctors it is often difficult to predict the onset or progression of chronic seizures. Thanks to a newly published study from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Anschutz Medical Campus, that may be changing. The study, led by Drs. Manisha Patel and Li-Ping Liang of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, was recently published in Redox Biology, a journal of the Society for Redox Biology and Medicine (SFRBM).

Researchers propose new explanation for symptoms of fragile X syndrome

  Until recently, scientists thought they understood one of the underlying causes of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability in the United States. The syndrome, which is associated with autism, was believed to be linked primarily to overactivity in a molecular pathway in the brain. But then, in 2014, two large-scale, multinational clinical trials aimed at treating fragile X by inhibiting that pathway failed.

Study shows continuous electrical stimulation suppresses seizures in patients with epilepsy

When surgery and medication don’t help people with epilepsy, electrical stimulation of the brain has been a treatment of last resort. Unfortunately, typical approaches, such as vagal nerve stimulation or responsive nerve stimulation, rarely stop seizures altogether. But a new Mayo Clinic study in JAMA Neurology shows that seizures were suppressed in patients treated with continuous electrical stimulation. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted. In the study, 13 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were deemed unsuitable for resective surgery, which removes a portion of the brain — usually about the size of a golf ball — that was causing seizures. When patients are evaluated for surgery, a grid of electrical contacts ...

Epilepsy patients more likely to experience increased risk of discrimination than general population

In a recent analysis, people with epilepsy were seven-fold more likely to have reported experiencing discrimination due to health problems than the general population. This risk was greater than other chronic health problems such as diabetes, asthma and migraines. People with epilepsy also had a greater likelihood of experiencing domestic violence and sexual abuse than the general population.

How technology is reducing seizures in patients with epilepsy

Via Miami Herald When 29-year-old Krystle Thrasher was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2011, she often had 10 to 15 seizures a month despite taking medication to help control her seizure activity. “After a seizure, I would be tired and just want to go to bed,” said Thrasher, a paralegal who lives in Sunrise with her husband and 9-month-old son. Epilepsy, the fourth most common neurological disorder, is defined by recurrent and unprovoked seizures. Seizure frequency varies depending on the type of seizure disorder, with some patients experiencing several seizures daily while others don’t have seizures for years at a time.

Researchers unravel mechanism by which hippocampal stem cells regulate their own fate

To date, it has been assumed that the differentiation of stem cells depends on the environment they are embedded in. A research group at the University of Basel now describes for the first time a mechanism by which hippocampal neural stem cells regulate their own cell fate via the protein Drosha. The journal Cell Stem Cell has published their results. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that have the potential to differentiate into many cell types. However, the cell types that somatic stem cells produce are usually restricted to those of the organ in which they sit. The current view proposes that stem cell differentiation is controlled by their local environment, the so-called niche. Thus, stem cells receive and interpret specific factors present in their niche that guide their different...

Researchers Develop A Sensor the Size of Sand

A new sensor built by several campus researchers has far-reaching potential to treat serious conditions such as paraplegia and epilepsy once implanted inside the body — all at the size of a grain of sand. The battery-free, wireless sensor is the first of its kind to record and relay bodily vital signs in real time using ultrasound. Published in the journal Neuron earlier this month, research on the sensor could catalyze advances in medicine by revealing an efficient way to monitor, and eventually control, numerous bodily functions. “The applications are as far as you can imagine — whatever you want to do,” said study co-author Ryan Neely, noting that the technology was originally designed to help paraplegic patients control robotic limbs. READ MORE AT SOURCE: http://www.dailycal.org/2016/0...

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