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Dump those derogatory disability terms

But don’t be overly politically correct about it   Disability language has changed dramatically in recent decades — most would argue for the better — but even advocates for change feel some of these new terms are “overly politically correct”.   With help from Link magazine, the NSW Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care has compiled a list of what’s okay to say and and what’s not.   The department advises against using “nice” euphemisms, such as ‘intellectually challenged’, ‘differently abled’ and ‘physically challenged’. These are a “denial of reality”, the department says. “Don’t use them.”   And calling somebody ‘special’ or ‘brave’ just because they have a disability is downr...

RAISING SUDEP AWARENESS IN PEDIATRIC EPILEPSY

This article appears in the AAP News and Journals Gateway Increasing Awareness of Sudden Death in Pediatric Epilepsy Together Gardiner Lapham, William Davis Gaillard, Joanna Sexter, Madison M. Berl The death of any child is tragic. When the death is sudden and unexpected, it can seem especially incomprehensible. Henry was 4 years old when he died only a few weeks after his epilepsy diagnosis; his parents were devastated and never knew that death could occur; no physician had discussed the possibility with them. Henry was an otherwise healthy child, had a history of febrile seizures, and died in his sleep before his epilepsy workup was complete and before his medication was likely therapeutic. Since Henry’s death 8 years ago, together and independently, Henry’s parents, pediatrician, and ne...

Psychiatric Manifestations of Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

BETHESDA, Md., Jan. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) comprises 30% of all partial epilepsies; it can masquerade as a primary psychiatric condition or be co-morbid with a psychiatric illness.

New Research Shows Promise for Surgery For Specific Epilepsy Cause

Neurology Advisor: Seizure Reduction Likely With Surgery in Nonlesional Neocortical Epilepsy

Recovery from TBI appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of sleep problems

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), people also experience major sleep problems, including changes in their sleep-wake cycle. A new study shows that recovering from these two conditions occurs in parallel. The study is published in the December 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Seizure Triggers: Research Sheds Lights on How Certain Stimuli Cause Seizures

Why does exposure to rhythmic stimulation at certain frequencies facilitate the occurrence of epileptic seizures?

Study improves molecular understanding of the brain in people with epilepsy

Neural stem cells have been found in epileptic brain tissue—outside the regions of the brain where they normally reside. In a group of patients who underwent surgery for epilepsy, over half had stem cells where healthy individuals do not have them, according to a study from Sahlgrenska Academy.

AVOIDING SIDE EFFECTS: Trial Administers Epilepsy Drugs Directly to the Brain

WORLD-first trial will deliver medication directly into the brain of epilepsy patients to sidestep the ­devastating side-effects of tablets. The pioneering treatment aims to be a game-changer for neurological conditions more widely by getting a drug directly where it is needed. The St Vincent’s Hospital team has implanted a pump in their first ­patient. The pump sends anti-epileptic medication from the stomach, through a tiny tube, into a cavity in the brain where it can diffuse into the areas causing the “electrical storm”. READ FULL STORY: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/melbourne-epilepsy-trial-delivers-medication-directly-into-brain-to-sidestep-side-effects/news-story/13612af0fd456d18583b60cd16d3102e

Symptom trends may help predict recovery of patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome

Researchers at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre’s (KNC) Canadian Concussion Centre (CCC) have identified symptom trends that may not only help predict how soon patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome (PCS) will recover, but also provide insight on how to treat those who experience persistent concussion symptoms.

Understanding Stroke Risk in Pregnancy

A New York State study found that younger, not older women suffered an increase risk of stroke, both during pregnancy and in postpartum. Younger women — not older women — had an increased risk of stroke during pregnancy and the postpartum period compared to non-pregnant women of the same age, according to the results of a new study published online October 24, 2016 in JAMA Neurology. Overall, pregnancy-associated stroke (PAS) accounted for 15 percent of strokes in women aged 12 to 24 years; 20 percent of strokes in women aged 25 to 34 years; 5 percent of strokes in women aged 35 to 44 years; and 0.05 percent of strokes in women aged 45 to 50 years.

Researchers discover a new stage of the development cycle of the human brain

Researchers discover mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex after birth Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain’s frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. The authors hypothesize that this late-stage migration may play a role in establishing fundamentally human cognitive abilities and that its disruption could underlie a number of neurodevelopmental diseases. Most neurons of the cerebral cortex – the outermost layer of the brain responsible for advanced cognition – migrate outward from their birthplaces deep in the brain to take up their positions within the cortex....

UAB researchers launch first drug study to prevent onset of epilepsy in children with TSC

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have launched the first drug study aimed at preventing or delaying the onset of epilepsy in children with a genetic condition known as tuberous sclerosis complex. UAB is the lead institution and data center for the PREVeNT study, a national, multisite study funded by a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form in many different organs. TSC particularly affects neurologic functions, often leading to seizures, developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism. About 80 percent of children with TSC develop epilepsy within the first three years of life.

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