Welcome to EpilepsyU.com a social network dedicated to the epilepsy community

Main Slider

Nanotubes go with the flow to penetrate brain tissue

Rice University researchers have invented a device that uses fast-moving fluids to insert flexible, conductive carbon nanotube fibers into the brain, where they can help record the actions of neurons.   The Rice team’s microfluidics-based technique promises to improve therapies that rely on electrodes to sense neuronal signals and trigger actions in patients with epilepsy and other conditions.

Presurgical imaging may predict whether epilepsy surgery will work

Rice University statisticians show integrative analysis can predict risk of postoperative seizures   Surgery to remove a part of the brain to give relief to patients with epilepsy doesn’t always result in complete seizure relief, but statisticians at Rice University have developed a method for integrating neuroimaging scans to identify patients at high risk of continued seizures before the surgery takes place.

Neurons: The basics

Neurons are responsible for carrying information throughout the human body. Using electrical and chemical signals, they help coordinate all of the necessary functions of life. In this article, we explain what neurons are and how they work.   In short, our nervous systems detect what is going on around us and inside of us; they decide how we should act, alter the state of internal organs (heart rate changes, for instance), and allows us to think about and remember what is going on. To do this, it relies on a sophisticated network — neurons.   It has been estimated that there are around 86 billion neurons in the brain; each one is connected to another 1,000 neurons. This creates an incredibly complex network of communication. Neurons are considered the basic units of the nervous sy...

Children born to mothers with arthritis are 160% more likely to have epilepsy

Conclusion from a study of 1.4 million births.   They are also three times as likely to develop the agonizing condition in later life   Experts say children born to arthritis sufferers should be given ‘special attention’   The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, was derived from 25 years of research  

Device Shows Long-term Efficacy for Intractable Seizures

Almost three quarters of patients with medically intractable seizures who received neurostimulation with a novel device called the RNS System (NeuroPace Inc) had sustained seizure reduction at 8 years, new research shows. Furthermore, the analysis found that almost a third of those receiving the RNS System had at least one 6-month period without seizures and that the treatment remained relatively safe over time.

Funnel web spiders’ ‘beautiful molecules’ show promise for treating epilepsy, stroke

Several new Australian-developed medicines showing promise treating childhood epilepsy, stroke and autoimmune diseases have emerged from an unusual source: the fangs of venomous creatures. Big pharmaceutical companies are excited by results showing these new venom-drugs are often superior to man-made drugs, and they are starting to pour money into research.

A dietary supplement dampens the brain hyperexcitability seen in seizures or epilepsy

Seizure disorders — including epilepsy — are associated with pathological hyperexcitability in brain neurons. Unfortunately, there are limited available treatments that can prevent this hyperexcitability. However, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found that inducing a biochemical alteration in brain proteins via the dietary supplement glucosamine was able to rapidly dampen that pathological hyperexcitability in rat and mouse models. These results, seen in animal models, represent a potentially novel therapeutic target for the treatment of seizure disorders.

Know more about febrile seizures in children

Febrile seizures (febrile convulsions) are fits (sic – Seizures) that can happen when a child has fever. They are the most common type of seizure in paediatric age group. They most commonly happen between the ages of 6 months to 6 years. The cumulative incidence is estimated about 5-7% and the peak incidence is noted at 18 months of age. It can be frightening and distressing to see your child having a seizure (fits), particularly if it is the first episode they are witnessing. 

Evogen Receives U.S. Patent Covering Its Novel Epilepsy Blood Test

Patent Covers Key Biomarkers in Evogen’s EvoScoreDX™ Biomarker-Based Blood Test for Distinguishing Epileptic Seizures; Addresses Major Unmet Need for Better Epilepsy Diagnostics Evogen, Inc., a leader in proteomics and genomics-based testing for improved diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders, today reported that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued a key patent covering the company’s biomarker-based blood test that can accurately identify epileptic seizures. It is the first patent to issue in Evogen’s multi-application intellectual property portfolio of blood-based biomarkers for seizure detection in epilepsy and other neurological diseases. U.S. Patent No. 9,772,335 is owned by the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and is exclusively licens...

Your neurons register familiar faces, whether you notice them or not

When people see an image of a person they recognize—the famous tennis player Roger Federer or actress Halle Berry, for instance—particular cells light up in the brain. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on September 21 have found that those cells light up even when a person sees a familiar face or object but fails to notice it. The only difference in that case is that the neural activity is weaker and delayed in comparison to what happens when an observer consciously registers and can recall having seen a particular image.

What should you do if a friend has a seizure?

Ten percent of people are expected to experience a seizure at some point during their lifetime, but would you know what to do if someone was having a seizure right next to you? Would you recognize it for what it was? Here, we give you an overview of different types of seizures and offer some helpful first aid tips.

Noninvasive Deep Brain Stimulation Can Become Reality, Mouse Study Shows

Researchers have, for the first time, showed that it is possible to stimulate structures deep within the brain without the need for implanted electrodes — opening the possibility that epilepsy patients could receive deep brain stimulation in a noninvasive manner. The method applies scalp electrodes that send two currents into the brain. Brain cells only become stimulated in the spot where the two currents intersect, making it possible to easily change the exact size and location of the treatment.

Lost Password

Register