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Head Taruma

Stopping Epilepsy Before It Starts?

“Being able to identify that a person is likely to develop epilepsy following a brain injury is one of the most important focus areas in modern-day epilepsy research,” says Dr. Laura Lubbers, CURE’s Chief Scientific Officer. “With 3.4 million Americans suffering from epilepsy and seizures in the U.S., this discovery of a predictive biomarker for a certain form of epilepsy could prevent unpredictable seizures from taking over the lives of millions of Americans and their families.”   New research, funded by Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE), has discovered a ‘smoking gun’ biomarker that could result in treatments that stop some epilepsies before they even start.   Using a rat model of brain injury and epilepsy, CURE-funded researcher Dr. Annamaria Vezzani and her team...

Are there signs of CTE in the brain tissue of younger people with epilepsy?

Younger adults with difficult-to-treat epilepsy may have early signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in their brain tissue, but it appears to be uncommon, according to a small, preliminary study published in the January 10, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a rare, degenerative brain disease most likely caused by repeated head trauma. People with CTE may develop symptoms like dementia, personality disorders or behavior problems. People with epilepsy can experience head trauma when they have full body seizures, also called tonic-clonic seizures, or partial or focal seizures where they lose some or all awareness of their surroundings.

New study hopes to shed light on mechanism behind epileptic and non-epileptic seizures

Seizures are a common result of traumatic brain injury, especially in military veterans. A new study funded by the DOD, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, and conducted in Providence RI and Birmingham AL (at the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Providence, RI and Birmingham, AL, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham) hopes to shed new light on the mechanism behind seizures associated with post-traumatic epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.   The $3.6 million award, W81XWH-17-1-0619 will examine whether a form of cognitive behavior therapy, a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy approach to problem-solving, could be effective in reducing the frequency and/or severity of seizures in those with TBI. Cognitive...

Slowing brain cell growth reduces risk of seizures

According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major contributor to disabilities and deaths in the U.S. Statistics indicate that 153 people die every day from injuries involving TBI.   TBI is a type of brain injury that occurs when trauma causes damage to the brain. An individual with mild TBI may experience unconsciousness for a few seconds, whereas an individual with severe TBI may have headaches that don’t go away, or in extreme cases, it can cause a loss of coordination and slurred speech.  

Memory decline after head injury may be prevented by slowing brain cell growth

The excessive burst of new brain cells after a traumatic head injury that scientists have traditionally believed helped in recovery could instead lead to epileptic seizures and long-term cognitive decline, according to a new Rutgers New Jersey Medical School study. In the September issue of Stem Cell Reports, Viji Santhakumar, associate professor in the department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience, and her colleagues, challenge the prevailing assumption by scientists in the field that excessive neurogenesis (the birth of new brain cells) after injury is advantageous.

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