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Epilepsy

Self-Management Programs Help with Epilepsy

For more than 10 years, the CDC Managing Epilepsy Well Network has developed and offered innovative self-management programs. Learn how people with epilepsy can better manage their condition by taking advantage of programs that work.   The Importance of Epilepsy Self-Management   Epilepsy is a broad term used for a brain disorder that causes seizures. Epilepsy can get in the way of life, mostly when seizures keep happening. Although there are many medicines to help prevent seizures, they don’t always work. In fact, more than half (56%) of adults with active epilepsy who take anti-seizure medicines are still having seizures.1 Uncontrolled seizures can increase the risk of injury, anxiety, depression, brain damage, and in rare cases, death. They can also interfere with activities s...

Research reveals underappreciated role of brainstem in epilepsy

New research from Vanderbilt suggests that repeated seizures reduce brainstem connectivity, a possible contributor to unexplained neurocognitive problems in epilepsy patients. The brainstem has been rarely studied in epilepsy because seizures typically originate in the temporal lobe or other areas of the cortex. Noting that people with temporal lobe epilepsy often lose consciousness even though the temporal lobe does not control wakefulness, Dario Englot, MD, Ph.D., surgical director of epilepsy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said he decided to focus on the region that does control wakefulness—the brainstem. He hypothesized that connectivity disruptions with the brainstem resulting from a history of seizures might play a role in diminished cognitive functions that are not related...

Prediction method for epileptic seizures developed

Epileptic seizures strike with little warning and nearly one third of people living with epilepsy are resistant to treatment that controls these attacks. More than 65 million people worldwide are living with epilepsy.

With Epilepsy on The Rise, Thousands of Americans Are Turning To The Internet For Advice

Epilepsy is on the rise in the USA, recent figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirm. According to a 2018 report issued by the CDC, “Active Epilepsy and Seizure Control in Adults — United States, 2013 and 2015”, the number of Americans self-reporting epilepsy rose from 2.3 million in 2010, to approximately 3 million in 2015. A 1994 report — Current Trends Prevalence of Self-Reported Epilepsy, United States, 1986-1990 — estimated that the number of Americans with self reported epilepsy was just 1.1 million at the time. Why we built the 100% non-profit EpilepsyU.com for U www.EpilepsyU.com reaches an average of 1.3 million visitors each month!) An increasing number of Americans are utilizing the internet for advice about their condition highlighting the...

Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Treatment Commences Clinical Trial Recruitment

This week, AMO Pharma Limited announced the commencement of patient recruitment for an interventional study of AMO-01, an investigational Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor for the treatment of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS).   “Treatment of Phelan-McDermid syndrome represents a significant area of unmet need in healthcare, and AMO Pharma is grateful to the research team at Mt. Sinai as well as the Phelan McDermid Syndrome Foundation for their commitment to this landmark research effort,” said Michael Snape, PhD, CEO of AMO Pharma. “Research thus far indicates that AMO-01 could have important applications in the treatment of patients living with Phelan-McDermid syndrome in the years ahead.”

FDA Approves Medtronic’s Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy for Refractory Epilepsy

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted premarket approval for Medtronic’s Deep Brain Stimulation DBS) therapy as adjunctive treatment for reducing the frequency of partial-onset seizures in individuals 18 years of age or older who are refractory to 3 or more antiepileptic medications.   The therapy delivers controls electrical pulses to the anterior nucleus of the thalamus, a target in the brain that is part of a network involved in seizures.

Research reveals new insights into severe childhood epilepsy

Genetic research reveals new insights into severe childhood epilepsy   In a new study on children with severe forms of epilepsy, researchers have found the genetic copying mistake that causes the severe epilepsy in children can be found in their parents who do not have epilepsy.   “The research findings are important for reproductive counselling because these young parents are often in the middle of forming their families,” says one of the researchers Associate Professor Sadleir, from the University of Otago, Wellington   The study, a collaborative research project between the University of Washington, University of Melbourne and University of Otago, Wellington, has just been published in the international journal New England Journal of Medicine.   “Our collaborators in...

How does epilepsy affect the brain and nervous system?

The brain and central nervous system Epilepsy is typically associated with symptoms of seizure. As such, the primary area that the condition affects is the central nervous system. The brain acts as the central hub in the body. Here, all voluntary and involuntary movements are controlled. Normally, electrical activity runs through the body’s nerve cells and assists the brain is sending messages or telling the body how to behave, react or move. Where there is a dysfunction, abnormal signals disrupt this process and cause distress. This brings on seizures:   Generalized seizures: This type involves both sides of the brain and results in loss of consciousness. A person may experience absence seizures or petit mal seizures (lasting about half a minute or less) which cause blank staring (ab...

What Modern Day Challenges Affect Epilepsy Treatment?

Researchers recently published an article in The Lancet Neurology discussing the difficulties facing seizure detection in patients with epilepsy.   Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that is characterised by short repetitive epileptic seizures. These seizures can be harmful to the individual depending on the circumstances in which they occur, such as a seizure while driving. This disorder is set apart from other neurological disorders since there is a broad range of different physiological changes that can cause it, leading to a large variation in symptoms and making it difficult to treat. While 70% of sufferers can be treated with pharmacological agents, 30% have no reliable anti-epileptic drugs that are effective for their particular type of epilepsy.

Antiepileptic drugs linked with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia, says research

According to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, DZNE, antiepileptic drugs are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.   The clinical investigation, led by Heidi Taipale from the University of Eastern Finland, evaluated the data of nearly 100,000 individuals with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (from Germany and Finland) to see if there was a link between continuous use of antiepileptics and these neurodegenerative diseases and compared it with controls.

Epilepsy tied to severe hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes

Adults with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for epilepsy, especially in the presence of severe hypoglycemia, compared with adults without type 2 diabetes, according to findings published in Diabetes Research & Clinical Practice.   Chung-Yi Lu, PhD, professor in the department and graduate Institute of Public Health at the College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan, and colleagues evaluated data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims on 751,792 adults with type 2 diabetes (mean age, 59.51 years; 51% women) and 824,253 matched controls (mean age, 59.47 years; 51% women) identified between 2002 and 2003 to determine the potential link between type 2 diabetes and epilepsy and the role that severe hypoglycemia may play in the relationship. Participants...

Educational Attainment Down With In Utero Exposure to AEDs

Exposure to sodium valproate or a combination of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in utero is associated with worse attainment on national educational tests for 7-year-olds, according to a study published online March 26 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. Arron S. Lacey, from Swansea University Medical School in the United Kingdom, and colleagues identified children born to mothers with epilepsy and linked these children to their national attainment Key Stage 1 (KS1) tests in mathematics, language, and science at age 7. The children were compared with matched children born to mothers without epilepsy.

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