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Epilepsy

Learning stress-reducing techniques may benefit people with epilepsy

Learning techniques to help manage stress may help people with epilepsy reduce how often they have seizures, according to a study published in the February 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.   “Despite all the advances we have made with new drugs for epilepsy, at least one-third of people continue to have seizures, so new options are greatly needed,” said study author Sheryl R. Haut, MD, of Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, NY, and member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Since stress is the most common seizure trigger reported by patients, research into reducing stress could be valuable.”   The study involved people with seizures that did no...

Infant’s scores on Apgar scale can predict risk of cerebral palsy or epilepsy

An infant’s scores on the so-called Apgar scale can predict the risk of a later diagnosis of cerebral palsy or epilepsy. The risk rises with decreasing Apgar score, but even slightly lowered scores can be linked to a higher risk of these diagnoses, according to an extensive observational study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the esteemed journal The BMJ.

Brain folding sheds light on neurological diseases, researchers find

It may seem unlikely that studying the mechanics of concrete would inform brain research. However, Ellen Kuhl, mechanical engineering professor and head researcher for the Living Matter Lab, started out studying the molecular interactions of concrete and is now applying this understanding to the field of neuroscience, where her research has led to groundbreaking discoveries about neurological disorders.

Brain training devised by Brighton researcher cuts epileptic seizures

Brain training devised by a Brighton clinical researcher can cut the number and frequency of epileptic seizures in patients who have not responded to drug treatment.   Details of the groundbreaking research have been published in The Lancet and Cell Press journal Ebiomedicine.   One in 100 people suffer with epilepsy – 50 million people worldwide – with about 30 per cent of them apparently unable to benefit from drugs to manage the condition.   About half of those taking part in clinical trials reported that the technique reduced seizures by 50 per cent or more.   It was invented by Yoko Nagai, Wellcome Trust Research Fellow at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School, run jointly by Brighton University and Sussex University.   The technique is seen as an alternative...

Population-Based Study Helps Predict Outcomes in Status Epilepticus

Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) in children without prior neurologic abnormalities is not associated with long-term cognitive or other neurologic deficits, according to a large new population-based study published online December 5, 2017 in The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health.   Previous smaller, hospital-based studies had reached similar conclusions, but independent experts told Neurology Today that the size, duration, and structure of this study, which included participants in the north London convulsive status epilepticus surveillance study cohort, allows clinicians to offer stronger reassurance to parents of children with CSE, defined as continuous or rapid sequential seizure activity for 30 minutes or more.   “This reinforces some of what we already knew, but fo...

Epilepsy associated with brain volume, thickness differences: Study

he largest-ever neuroimaging study of people with epilepsy shows that epilepsy involves more widespread physical differences than previously assumed   Epilepsy, a disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain is disturbed, is linked to brain volume and thickness differences, according to a study.   Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects 0.6-1.5% of the global population, comprising many different syndromes and conditions, and defined by a tendency for seizures.   The research was led by UCL and the Keck School of Medicine of USC.   The largest-ever neuroimaging study of people with epilepsy shows that epilepsy involves more widespread physical differences than previously assumed, even in types of epilepsy that are typically considered to be more benign if...

Duchenne May Affect the Brain Too, Study Contends

Researchers have found that Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients usually have simultaneous neurological disorders or abnormalities, including epilepsy.   Particularly, those who had epilepsy also had the neurodevelopmental condition attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or the neuropsychiatric conditions obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety or sleep disorders.

What to know about complex partial seizures

A complex partial seizure is a type of seizure that arises in one lobe of the brain, rather than the whole brain. The seizure affects people’s awareness and may cause them to lose consciousness.   Complex partial seizures are now more commonly referred to as focal onset impaired awareness seizures or focal impaired awareness seizures.

Are there signs of CTE in the brain tissue of younger people with epilepsy?

Younger adults with difficult-to-treat epilepsy may have early signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in their brain tissue, but it appears to be uncommon, according to a small, preliminary study published in the January 10, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a rare, degenerative brain disease most likely caused by repeated head trauma. People with CTE may develop symptoms like dementia, personality disorders or behavior problems. People with epilepsy can experience head trauma when they have full body seizures, also called tonic-clonic seizures, or partial or focal seizures where they lose some or all awareness of their surroundings.

Over 1/3 of New Cases of Epilepsy are Treatment Refractory

More than one-third of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy do not respond to treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), according to a study published online in JAMA Neurology. Zhibin Chen, PhD, from the University of Melbourne in Australia, and colleagues conducted a longitudinal observational cohort study to assess long-term outcomes in 1795 patients with newly diagnosed and treated epilepsy. Patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years or until death.

What are the symptoms of partial (focal onset) seizures? Types, causes, and treatment

A partial seizure is a surge of electrical activity in just one area of the brain. These seizures are also known as focal onset seizures. A focal seizure can happen for a number of different reasons, so determining the underlying cause is the key to proper treatment.   People who suffer from partial seizures or focal onset seizures experience a lot of physical symptoms, including muscle contractions, visual disturbances, and even blackouts. All of this can be rather frightening.

Monthly brain cycles predict seizures in patients with epilepsy

Implanted electrodes reveal long-term patterns of seizure risk.   University of California San Francisco neurologists have discovered monthly cycles of brain activity linked to seizures in patients with epilepsy. The finding, published online January 8 in Nature Communications, suggests it may soon be possible for clinicians to identify when patients are at highest risk for seizures, allowing patients to plan around these brief but potentially dangerous events.

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